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Business Schools and the Development of Responsible Leaders: A Proposition of Edgar Morin’s Transdisciplinarity

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Abstract

We propose Edgar Morin’s notion of transdisciplinarity as a complementary educational perspective for preparing business school students in addressing the complex global socio-economic and environmental challenges that our planet has been facing for some time. Morin’s notion of transdisciplinarity spans various disciplines, both within disciplines and beyond individual disciplines. Morin’s transdisciplinary approach is inquiry driven and presents a systemic/humanistic vision and form of awareness that challenges habitually dualistic and simplistic thinking. Morin’s transdisciplinarity is based on a dialogical and translogical principle that extends classical and rigid logic and that helps students to explore and unify concepts of a simultaneous complementary and contradictory nature. Confronting students with different modes of thinking, imagining and feeling can help them to develop greater self-awareness, critical reflection, and creativity; with various frames of reference; and with an openness toward and confidence in engaging in changes needed to address global challenges in a sustainable and responsible way.

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Notes

  1. In a preface to Edgar Morin’s (1999a) Seven complex lessons in education for the future published by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

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Gröschl, S., Gabaldon, P. Business Schools and the Development of Responsible Leaders: A Proposition of Edgar Morin’s Transdisciplinarity. J Bus Ethics 153, 185–195 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-016-3349-6

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