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Going Against the Grain Works: An Attributional Perspective of Perceived Ethical Leadership

Abstract

This study provides an attributional perspective to the ethical leadership literature by examining the role of attributed altruistic motives and perceptions of organizational politics in a moderated mediation model. Path analytic tests from two field studies were used for analyses. The results support our hypotheses that attributed altruistic motives would mediate the relationship between perceived ethical leadership and affective organizational commitment. Moreover, the relationship between perceived ethical leadership and attributed altruistic motives was stronger when perceptions of organizational politics were high but weaker when these perceptions were low. The study concludes with a discussion of future research implications as well as managerial implications.

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Li, C., Wu, K., Johnson, D.E. et al. Going Against the Grain Works: An Attributional Perspective of Perceived Ethical Leadership. J Bus Ethics 141, 87–102 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2698-x

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Keywords

  • Perceived ethical leadership
  • Attributed altruistic motives
  • Perceptions of organizational politics
  • Affective organizational commitment