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What is the CSR’s Focus in Healthcare?

Abstract

The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been the subject of several academic contributions, but in the health sector the development of an interest in this subject is very recent. Although many practices in healthcare are already socially responsible, progressing from a series of socially responsible behaviours to a socially responsible organization entails a more consolidated awareness of the health sector’s mission and the needs of its participants. In this paper, we will review the different studies published that address the relationship between the healthcare sector’s corporate responsibility and society, with the aims of individuating the prevailing foci that are emerging and categorizing the proposed contributions according to these foci: social responsibility and organization; social responsibility and social impact; social responsibility and competitiveness. Finally, the paper finishes with a personal definition of CSR and its correlated ethical roots.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    A study edited by “Sole 24 ore sanità”(31 maggio 2011) entitled “in corsia più infezioni e meno sicurezza” shows that infections in hospitals are more frequent than at home […] a result which demonstrates that a clinical environment is less wealthy than a domestic one.

  2. 2.

    Werhane (2000, pp. 169–181) “Stakeholder theory assumes that the organization and all its stakeholders form a shared moral community, and it appeals to moral minimums or principles of fairness when evaluating organizational decisions” Business Ethics, Stakeholder Theory and the Ethics of Healthcare Organizations.

  3. 3.

    The New Contractualism approach considers that legitimacy, the justice or the foundation of the institutions, is derived from an agreement by the individuals who are subjected to it. (Bompiani philosophical encyclopaedia).

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Acknowledgments

The author would like to thank Prof. R. Alvira, Prof. A. Argandoña and Prof. S. Bavetta for their helpful and constructive comments.

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Correspondence to Fabrizio Russo.

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Russo, F. What is the CSR’s Focus in Healthcare?. J Bus Ethics 134, 323–334 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-014-2430-2

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Keywords

  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Healthcare
  • Local community
  • Appropriateness
  • Social impact
  • Competitiveness