The Comparison of Two Different Physiotherapy Methods in Treatment of Lymphedema after Breast Surgery

Summary

Background. The aim of this study was to compare two different physiotherapy methods in the treatment of lymphedema after breast surgery.

Methods. This study was performed on 53 patients who had developed unilatreral lymphedema after the breast cancer treatment. Twenty-seven patients served as the experimental group and were treated with complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) applications including lymph drainage, multi layer compression bandage, elevation, remedial exercises and skin care. Twenty-six patients in the control group were treated with standard physiotherapy (SP) applications including bandage, elevation, head–neck and shoulder exercises and skin care. Both groups were recommended a home program consisting of compression bandage exercises, skin care and walking. Patients were taken to a therapy program once a day; 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The range of motion, circumferential measurement, and volumetric measurement were assessed before and after treatment.

Results. The overall improving in the CDP group was shown to be greater than the SP group but when the evaluation results of both groups were compared before and after treatment, a significant statistical difference in edema according to circumferential and volumetric measurements results was found in favor of the CDP group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion. In the patients with upper extremity lymphedema, the shoulder mobility can be increased and edema can be decreased by the use of complex physiotherapy programs.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. 1.

    A Megens SR Harris (1998) ArticleTitlePhysical therapist management of lymphedema following treatment for breast cancer: a critical review of its effectiveness Phys Ther 78 IssueID2 1302–1311 Occurrence Handle9859949

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  2. 2.

    SR Harris SL Niesen-Vertommen (2000) ArticleTitleChallenging the myth of exercise- induced lymphedema following breast cancer: a series of case reports Journal of Surgical Oncology 74 95–99 Occurrence Handle10.1002/1096-9098(200006)74:2<95::AID-JSO3>3.0.CO;2-Q Occurrence Handle10914817

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. 3.

    L Andersen I Hojris M Erlandsen J Andersen (2000) ArticleTitleTreatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema with or without manual lymphatic drainage Acta Oncol 39 395–405

    Google Scholar 

  4. 4.

    DS Reintgen CE Cox CA Puleo (1998) Lymphedema in the post mastectomy patient: pathophysiology, prevention and management KI Bland EM Copeland (Eds) The Breast: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Disease EditionNumber2nd NumberInSeries  W.B. Saunders Company Philadelphia 1003–1011

    Google Scholar 

  5. 5.

    SG Rockson (2001) ArticleTitleLymphedema: a review Am J Med 110 288–295 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0002-9343(00)00727-0 Occurrence Handle11239847

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  6. 6.

    SR Cohen DK Payne RS Tunkel (2001) ArticleTitleLymphedema : strategies for management Cancer Suppl 92 IssueID4 980–988

    Google Scholar 

  7. 7.

    S Daane P Poltoratszy B Rockwell (1998) ArticleTitlePostmastectomy lymphedema management: evolution of the complex decongestive therapy technique Ann Plast Surg 40 IssueID2 128–134 Occurrence Handle9495459

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  8. 8.

    MJ Brennan RW DePompolo FH Garden (1996) ArticleTitleFocused review: post mastectomy lymphedema Arch Phys Med Rehabil 77 S74–S80 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0003-9993(96)90248-8 Occurrence Handle8599548

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. 9.

    MJ Brennan LT Miller (1998) ArticleTitleOverview of treatment options and review of the current role and use of compression garments intermittent pumps, and exercise in the management of lymphedema Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2821–2827

    Google Scholar 

  10. 10.

    CM Badger JL Peacock PS Mortimer (1998) ArticleTitleA randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial comparing multilayer bandaging followed by hosiery versus hosiery alone in the treatment of patients with lymphedema of the limb Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2832–2837

    Google Scholar 

  11. 11.

    A Szuba R Achalu SG Rockson (2002) ArticleTitleDecongestive lymphatic therapy for patients with breast carcinoma-associated lymphedema Cancer 95 IssueID11 2260–2267 Occurrence Handle10.1002/cncr.10976 Occurrence Handle12436430

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  12. 12.

    JA Petrek MC Heelan (1998) ArticleTitleIncidence of breast carcinoma-related lymphedema Cancer 83 IssueID12 2777–2781 Occurrence Handle10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19981215)83:12B+<2776::AID-CNCR25>3.0.CO;2-V

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. 13.

    SM Ramos LS O’Donnell G Knight (1999) ArticleTitleEdema volume not timing, is the key to success in lymphedema treatment Am J Surg 178 311–315 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0002-9610(99)00185-3 Occurrence Handle10587190

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  14. 14.

    ME Rinehart-Ayres (1998) ArticleTitleConservative approaches to lymphedema treatment Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2828–2832

    Google Scholar 

  15. 15.

    PS Mortimer (1995) ArticleTitleManaging lymphedema Clin Dermatol 13 499–505 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0738-081X(95)00095-W Occurrence Handle8665461

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  16. 16.

    E Földi (1998) ArticleTitleThe treatment lymphedema Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2833–2834

    Google Scholar 

  17. 17.

    SJ Stikeleather TW Worrell (2003) ArticleTitleConcurrent validity calculated volume derived from girth measurements and water displacement volume Phys Ther 83 134–145 Occurrence Handle12564949

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  18. 18.

    Badger C, Seers K, Preston N, Mortimer P: Physical therapies for reducing and controlling lymphedema of the limb. In: The Cochrane Library, issue 4, Oxford, 2002

  19. 19.

    M Földi R StröBenneother (2000) Grundlagen der manuellen lymphdrainage Urban& Fischer Germany 55–65

    Google Scholar 

  20. 20.

    P. Armitage G. Berry JNS Matthews (2002) Statistical methods in medical research. (4th edn) Blackwell Salence Oxford 272–306

    Google Scholar 

  21. 21.

    Pezner RD, Patterson MP, Hill LR: Arm edema in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer: relationship to patient age and axillary node dissection technique. In Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 12: 2079–2083, 1986

  22. 22.

    Stillwell GK: Treatment of postmastectomy lymphedema. Mod Treat 6: 396–412, 1969

    Google Scholar 

  23. 23.

    Kurz I: Textbook of Dr. Vodder's Manual Lymph Drainage (Vol 2. Therapy, 2nd ed.) Harris RS, Trans. Heidelberg, Karl S, Haugh Publishers: Germany, 1989

  24. 24.

    MJ Brennan J Weitz (1992) ArticleTitleLymphedema 30 years after radical mastectomy Am J Phys Med Rehabil 71 12–14 Occurrence Handle1739437

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  25. 25.

    SR Harris MR Hugi IA Olivotto M Levine (2001) ArticleTitleClinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 11.lymphedema CMAJ 164 IssueID2 191–198 Occurrence Handle11332311

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  26. 26.

    InstitutionalAuthorNameAmerican Cancer Society Lymphedema Workshop (1998) ArticleTitleWorkshop III. Diagnosis and management of lymphedema Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2882–2885

    Google Scholar 

  27. 27.

    H Brorsan H Suensson (1998) ArticleTitleLiposuction combined with controlled compression therapy reduced arm lymphedema more effectively than controlled compression therapy alone Plast Reconstr Surg. 102 1058–1067 Occurrence Handle9734424

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  28. 28.

    JR Casley-Smith M Boris S Weindorf B Lasinski (1998) ArticleTitleTreatment for lymphedema of the arm- the Casley-Smith method Cancer Suppl 83 IssueID12 2843–2860

    Google Scholar 

  29. 29.

    DS Ko R Lerner AB Klose Gcosimi (1998) ArticleTitleEffective treatment of lymphedema of the extremities Arch Surg 133 452–458 Occurrence Handle10.1001/archsurg.133.4.452 Occurrence Handle9565129

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  30. 30.

    M Wozniewski R Jasinski U Pilch G Dabrowska (2001) ArticleTitleComplex physical therapy for lymphedema of the limbs Physiotherapy 87 IssueID5 252–256

    Google Scholar 

  31. 31.

    K Matthews J Smith (1996) ArticleTitleEffectiveness of modified complex physical therapy for lymphoedema treatment Aust Physiotherapy 42 IssueID4 323–328

    Google Scholar 

  32. 32.

    JR Casley- Smith (1992) ArticleTitleModern treatment of lymphedema I. Complex physical therapy: the first 200 Australian limbs Australas J Dermatol 33 61–68 Occurrence Handle1294054

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Karadіbak Dіdem.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Dіdem, K., Ufuk, Y.S., Serdar, S. et al. The Comparison of Two Different Physiotherapy Methods in Treatment of Lymphedema after Breast Surgery. Breast Cancer Res Treat 93, 49–54 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-005-3781-2

Download citation

Keywords

  • complex decongestive physiotherapy
  • lymphedema