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The importance of homology for biology and philosophy

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Notes

  1. These discussions include Amundson (2005), Amundson and Lauder (1994), Brandon (1999), Brigandt (2002, 2003), Griffiths (1994, 1996, 2006), Matthen (1998, 2000), and Sober (1988).

  2. http://www.public.asu.edu/∼jrobert6/phildevo.htm

  3. http://www.ishpssb.org/

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Acknowledgements

Ingo Brigandt’s work on this introduction and the editing of this special issue was funded with an Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Postdoctoral Fellowship by the Killam Trusts, Canada.

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Brigandt, I., Griffiths, P.E. The importance of homology for biology and philosophy. Biol Philos 22, 633–641 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10539-007-9094-6

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