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Can Evolution Explain Insanity?

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I distinguish three evolutionary explanations of mental illness: first, breakdowns in evolved computational systems; second, evolved systems performing their evolutionary function in a novel environment; third, evolved personality structures. I concentrate on the second and third explanations, as these are distinctive of an evolutionary psychopathology, with progressively less credulity in the light of the empirical evidence. General morals are drawn for evolutionary psychiatry.

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Murphy, D. Can Evolution Explain Insanity?. Biol Philos 20, 745–766 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10539-004-2279-3

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