Biologia Plantarum

, Volume 55, Issue 2, pp 396–399 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci in Aegiphila sellowiana and their transferability

  • E. A. Ruas
  • J. O. Damasceno
  • A. R. O. Conson
  • B. F. Costa
  • L. A. Rodrigues
  • M. Reck
  • A. O. Santos Vieira
  • C. deF. Ruas
  • C. Medri
  • P. M. Ruas
Brief Communication

Abstract

We isolated and characterized eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci for Aegiphila sellowiana an outcrossing pioneer tree species that is frequently used in reforestation programs of tropical riparian forests in Brazil. A total of 38 alleles were detected across a sample of 45 individuals of A. sellowiana, with an average number of 3.45 alleles per locus. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.430 and the observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosity values varied from 0.156 to 1.000 and 0.145 to 0.730, respectively. Eight loci exhibited significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P ≤ 0.001) and 32 pair combinations of loci showed significant linkage disequilibrium (P ≤ 0.001). All 11 primers were tested for cross amplification in 12 species belonging to the family Lamiaceae and 5 species belonging to the related family Verbenaceae. The sequence and diversity information obtained using these microsatellites and their cross-transferability to other species of Lamiaceae as well as Verbenaceae will increase our understanding of genetic structures and species relationships within Aegiphyla and other genera of these families.

Additional key words

cross amplification genetic diversity Lamiaceae microsatellite primers Verbenaceae 

Abbreviations

SSR

microsatellite or simple sequence repeat

CTAB

cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

PCR

polymerase chain reaction

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Ruas
    • 1
  • J. O. Damasceno
    • 1
  • A. R. O. Conson
    • 2
  • B. F. Costa
    • 2
  • L. A. Rodrigues
    • 2
  • M. Reck
    • 2
  • A. O. Santos Vieira
    • 3
  • C. deF. Ruas
    • 2
  • C. Medri
    • 4
  • P. M. Ruas
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Agronomia, Centro de Ciências AgráriasUniversidade Estadual de LondrinaLondrina, ParanáBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de Biologia Geral, Centro de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Estadual de LondrinaLondrina, ParanáBrazil
  3. 3.Departamento de Biología Animal e Vegetal, Centro de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Estadual de LondrinaLondrina, ParanáBrazil
  4. 4.Departamento de BiologiaUniversidade do Norte do Paraná, BandeirantesParanáBrazil

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