Skip to main content
Log in

Methane Budget of a Black Forest Spruce Ecosystem Considering Soil Pattern

  • Published:
Biogeochemistry Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Abstract

Study included seven soils, an adjacent spring and brook and was conducted to estimate CH4 source and sink strengths of forest soils along a wetness gradient, i.e. their exchange with atmosphere (direct emission), and hydrosphere (indirect emission). Soils are represented by anaerobic Histosol, oxic Cambisols, Histosol with degraded peatlayers and Gleysols having intermediate redox state. They could be separated into three emission groups: CH4 emitting (248–318 kg C ha−1 a−1), CH4 uptake (−0.1 to −5 kg C ha−1 a−1), and soils on the edge of CH4 uptake and release (−0.2–20 kg C ha−1 a−1). Although soils with CH4 uptake were dominant (75%), the soil specific CH4 budget identified the study field (6.53 ha) as CH4 source (40.9 kg C ha−1 a−1). Not only CH4 emissions, but also dissolved CH4 in soil solution varied regularly with soil type. Individual soil solutions contained 0.008–151 μmol CH4 l−1. CH4 vanished to negligible loads, when dissolved CH4 passed an oxidative downslope soil zone, but promoted CH4 uptake was measured at this soil. In turn, CH4 was discharged to the atmosphere, when the soil solution left the pedosphere across an anaerobic soil zone. These measured indirect emissions were low (34 g C a−1), but the values of individual soil solution indicate possible higher discharges (3.9 kg a−1) at a different soil pattern. The results suggest that CH4 uptake rates of temperate forests are overestimated.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • M.C.R. Alberto J.R.M. Arah H.-U. Neue R. Wassmann R.S. Lantin J.B. Aduna (2000) ArticleTitleA sampling technique for the determination of dissolved methane in soil solution Chemosphere Global Change Sci. 2 57–63 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S1465-9972(99)00044-6

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • I. Aselman P.J. Crutzen (1989) ArticleTitleGlobal distribution of natural freshwater wetlands and rice paddies, their net primary productivity, seasonally and possible methane emissions J. Atmos. Chem. 8 307–358 Occurrence Handle10.1007/BF00052709

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K.B. Bartlett P.M. Crill R.L. Sass R.C. Harriss N.B. Dise (1992) ArticleTitleMethane emissions from tundra environmental in the Yukon-Kuskokwim DeltaAlaska J. Geophys. Res. 97 16645–16660

    Google Scholar 

  • K.B. Bartlett R.C. Harriss (1993) ArticleTitleReview and assessment of methane emissions from wetlands Chemosphere 26 261–320 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0045-6535(93)90427-7

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • M. Bender R. Conrad (1992) ArticleTitleKinetics of CH4 oxidation in oxic soils exposed to ambient air or high CH4 mixing ratios FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 101 261–270 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0378-1097(92)90823-7

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bodegom van P.M., Verburg P.H. and Denier van der Gon A.C. 2002. Upscalling methane emissions from rice paddies: problems and possibilities. Global Biochem. Cycles 16: 10.1029/2000GB0013811.

  • P. Boeckx O. Cleemput ParticleVan I. Villaralvo (1997) ArticleTitleMethane oxidation in soils with different textures and land use Nutr. Cycles Agroecosyst. 49 914–95

    Google Scholar 

  • R.D. Bowden M.S. Castor J.M. Melillo P.A. Steudler J.D. Aber (1993) ArticleTitleFluxes of greenhouse gases between soils and the atmosphere in a temerate forest following a simulated hurricane blowdown Biogeochemistry 21 61–71

    Google Scholar 

  • A. Brown S.P. Mathur J. Kushner (1989) ArticleTitleAn ombrotrophic bog as a methane reservoir Global Biogeochem. Cycles 3 205–213

    Google Scholar 

  • R. Brumme W. Borken (1999) ArticleTitleSite variation in methane oxidation as affected by atmospheric deposition and type of temperate forest ecosystem Global Biogeochem. Cycles 13 493–501 Occurrence Handle10.1029/1998GB900017

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K. Butterbach-Bahl R. Gasche C.H. Huber K. Kreutzer K. Papen (1998) ArticleTitleImpact of N-input by wet deposition on N-trace gas fluxes and CH4-oxidation in spruce forest ecosystems of the temperate zone in Europe Atmos. Environ. 32 559–564 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S1352-2310(97)00234-3

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • M.S. Castro P.A. Steudler J.M. Melillo J.D. Aber S. Millham (1995) ArticleTitleExchange of N2O and CH4 between the atmosphere and soils in spruce-fir forests in the north-eastern United States Biochemistry 18 119–135

    Google Scholar 

  • H.L. Clever C.L. Young (1986) IUPAC – Solubility Data Series. Methane Oxford Pergamon

    Google Scholar 

  • R. Conrad (1996) ArticleTitleSoil microorganisms as controllers of atmospheric trace gases (H2CO, CH4OCS, N2O, and NO) Microbiol. Rev. 60 609–670 Occurrence Handle8987358

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • P.M. Crill (1991) ArticleTitleSeasonal patterns of methane uptake and carbon dioxide release by a temperate woodland soil Global Biogeochem. Cycles 5 319–334

    Google Scholar 

  • P.M. Crill P.J. Martikainen H. Nykanen J. Silvola (1994) ArticleTitleTemperature and N fertilization effects on methane oxidation in a drained peatland soil Soil Biol. Biochem. 26 1331–1339 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0038-0717(94)90214-3

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • T.R. Christensen T. Friborg M. Sommerkorn J. Kaplan L. Illeris H. Soegaard C. Nordstroem S. Jonasson (1999) ArticleTitleTrace gas exchange in a high-arctic valley. 1. Variations in CO2 and CH4 flux between tundra vegetation Global Biogeochem. Cycles 14 701–713 Occurrence Handle10.1029/1999GB001134

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • T.R. Christensen N. Panikov M. Mastepanov A. Joabsson A. Stewart M. Öquist M. Sommerkorn S. Reynaud B. Svensson (2003) ArticleTitleBiotic controls on CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands – a closed environment study Biogeochemistry 64 337–354 Occurrence Handle10.1023/A:1024913730848

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • M.A. Angelis ParticleDe M.I. Scranton (1993) ArticleTitleFate of methane in the Hudson river and estuary Global Biogeochem. Cycles 7 509–523

    Google Scholar 

  • S.J. Del Grosso W.J. Parton A.R. Moiser D.S. Ojima C.S. Potter W. Borken R. Brumme K. Butterbach-Bahl P.M. Crill K. Dobbie K.A. Smith (2000) ArticleTitleGeneral CH4 oxidation model and comparison of CH4 oxidation in natural and managed systems Global Biogeochem. Cycles 14 999–1019 Occurrence Handle10.1029/1999GB001226

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K.E. Dobbie K.A. Smith (1996) ArticleTitleComparison of CH4 oxidation rates in woodlandarable and set aside soils Soil Biol. Biochem. 28 1357–1365 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0038-0717(96)00152-6

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K.E. Dobbie K.A. Smith A. Prieme S. Christensen A. Degorska P. Orlanski (1996) ArticleTitleEffect of land use on the rate of methane uptake by surface soils in Northern Europe Atmos. Environ. 30 1005–1011 Occurrence Handle10.1016/1352-2310(95)00416-5

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • H. Dörr L. Katruff I. Levin (1993) ArticleTitleSoil texture parametrization of the methane uptake in aerated soils Chemosphere 26 697–713 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0045-6535(93)90454-D

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • P. Dunfield R. Knowles R. Dumont T.R. Moore (1993) ArticleTitleMethane production and consumption in temperate and subarctic peat soils: response to temperature and pH Soil Biol. Biochem. 25 321–326 Occurrence Handle10.1016/0038-0717(93)90130-4

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • B. Eilrich P. Steinmann (2003) ArticleTitleAcetate in deep peat bog environments – seasonal variations and implications for methanogenesis: investigations of an ombrotrophic peat bog in the Jura mountains, Switzerland Z. dt. Geol. Ges. 153 145–157

    Google Scholar 

  • E.J. Fechner H.F. Hemond (1992) ArticleTitleMethane transport and oxidation in the unsaturated zone of a Sphagnum peatland Global Biogeochem. Cycles 6 33–44

    Google Scholar 

  • S. Fiedler M. Sommer (2000) ArticleTitleMethane emissions, groundwater table and redox potentials along a gradient of redoximorphic soils in a temperate-humid climate Global Biogeochem. Cycles 14 1081–1093 Occurrence Handle10.1029/1999GB001255

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • S. Fiedler H.P.F. Jungkunst R. Jahn M. Kleber M. Sommer K. Stahr (2002) ArticleTitleLinking soil classification and soil dynamics – pedological and ecological perspectives J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. 165 517–529 Occurrence Handle10.1002/1522-2624(200208)165:4<517::AID-JPLN517>3.0.CO;2-#

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • S. Fiedler G.U. Scholich M. Kleber (2003) ArticleTitleInnovative electrode design helps to use redox potential as a predictor for Methane emissions from soils Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 34 481–496 Occurrence Handle10.1081/CSS-120017833

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • H. Flessa P. Dörsch F. Beese (1998) ArticleTitleSeasonal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes in differently managed arable soils in southern Germany J. Geophys. Res. 100 23115–23124 Occurrence Handle10.1029/95JD02270

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R.C. Harris D.I. Sebacher (1981) ArticleTitleMethane flux in forested freshwater swamps of the southeastern United States Geophys. Res. Lett. 8 1002–1004

    Google Scholar 

  • A.X. Hou G.X. Chen Z.P. Wang O. Cleemput ParticleVan W.H. Patrick SuffixJr (2000) ArticleTitleMethane and nitrous oxide emissions from a rice field in relation to soil redox and microbiological processes Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 64 2180–2186

    Google Scholar 

  • J.T. Huttunen J. Alm A. Liikanen S. Juutinen T. Larmola T. Hammar J. Silvola P.J. Martikainen (2003) ArticleTitleFluxes of methanecarbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in boreal lakes and potential anthropogenic effects on the aquatic greenhouse gas emission Chemosphere 52 609–621 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0045-6535(03)00243-1 Occurrence Handle12738299

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • J.T. Huttunen T.S. Väisänen M. Heikkinen S. Hellsten H. Nykänen O. Nenonen P.J. Martikainen (2002b) ArticleTitleExchange of CO2CH4N2O between the atmosphere and two northern boreal ponds with catchments dominated by peatlands or forest Plant Soil 242 137–146 Occurrence Handle10.1023/A:1019606410655

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Huttunen J.T., Väisänen T.S., Hellsten S., Heikkinen M., Nykänen H., Jungner H., Niskanen A., Virtanen M.O., Lindquist O.V., Nenonen O. and Martikainen P.J 2002a. Fluxes of CH4CO2N2O in hydroelectric reservoirs Lokka and porttipahta in the northern boreal zone in Finland. Global Biogeochem. Cycles 16: 10.1029/2000GB001316.

  • InstitutionalAuthorNameIPCC (1996) Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories: Reference Manual OECD/OCDE Paris

    Google Scholar 

  • InstitutionalAuthorNameIPCC (1997) Agriculture: Nitrogen oxides from agricultural soils and manure management OECD/OCDE Paris

    Google Scholar 

  • IPCC 2001. Climate Change 2001. http://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wgi/134.htm#4211 .

  • InstitutionalAuthorNameISSS-ISRIC-FAO (1998) World Reference Base for Soil Resources FAO Rome

    Google Scholar 

  • A. Joabsson T.R. Christensen B. Wallén (1999) ArticleTitleVascular plant controls on methane emissions from northern peatforming wetlands TREE 14 385–388 Occurrence Handle10481199

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • A. Joabsson T.R. Christensen (2001) ArticleTitleMethane emissions from wetlands and their relation with vascular plants: an Arctic example Global Change Biol. 7 919–932 Occurrence Handle10.1046/j.1354-1013.2001.00044.x

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jungkunst H., Fiedler S. and Stahr K. 2004. N2O of a mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) stand in the Black Forest (SW-Germany) as differentiated by the soil pattern. J. Geophys. Res-Atmos. 109: DO7302.

  • M.A. Kähkönen C. Wittmann H. Ilvesniemi C.J. Westman M.S. Salkinoja-Salonen (2002) ArticleTitleMineralization of detritus and oxidation of methane in acid boreal coniferous forest soils: seasonal and vertical distribution and effects of clear-cut Soil Biol. Biochem. 34 1191–1200 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0038-0717(02)00056-1

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Å. Kasimir-Klemedtsson L. Klemedtsson (1997) ArticleTitleMethane uptake in Swedish forest soils in relation to liming and extra N-deposition Biol. Fertil. Soils 25 296–301 Occurrence Handle10.1007/s003740050318

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kelley C.A. and Jeffrey W.H. 2002. Dissolved methane concentration profiles and air–sea fluxes from 41° S to 27° N. Global Biogeochem. Cycles 16: 101029-/2001GB001809.

  • A. Kettunen V. Kaitala J. Alm J. Silvola H. Nykänen P.J. Martikainen (1996) ArticleTitleCross-correlation analysis of the dynamic of methane emissions from a boreal peatland Global Biogeochem. Cycles 10 457–471 Occurrence Handle10.1029/96GB01609

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R. Lessard P. Rochette E. Tapp E. Pattey R. Desjardins G. Beaumont (1994) ArticleTitleMethane and carbon fluxes from poorly drained adjacent cultivated and forest sites Can. J. Soil Sci. 94 139–146

    Google Scholar 

  • Y. Lu R. Wassmann H.-U. Neue C. Huang (2000) ArticleTitleDynamics of dissolved organic carbon and methane emissions in a flooded rice soil Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 64 2011–2017

    Google Scholar 

  • E. Matthews I. Fung (1987) ArticleTitleMethane emissions from natural wetlands Global Biogeochem. Cycles 1 61–86

    Google Scholar 

  • O.V. Menyailo B.A. Hungate (2002) ArticleTitleInteractive effects of tree species and soil moisture on methane consumption Soil Biol. Biochem. 35 625–628 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0038-0717(03)00018-X

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • J.J. Middelburg J. Nieuwenhuize N. Iversen N. Høgh H. Wilde ParticleDe W. Helder R. Seifert O. Christof (2002) ArticleTitleMethane distribution in European tidal estuaries Biogeochemistry 59 95–119 Occurrence Handle10.1023/A:1015515130419

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • A. Moiser D. Schimel D. Balentine K. Bronson W. Parton (1991) ArticleTitleMethane and nitrous oxide fluxes in nativefertilized and cultivated grasslands Nature 350 330–332 Occurrence Handle10.1038/350330a0

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • T.R. Moore M. Dalva (1993) ArticleTitleThe influence of temperature and water table position on carbon dioxide and methane emissions from laboratory columns of peatland soils J. Soil Sci. 44 651–664

    Google Scholar 

  • H.J. Nykänen J. Alm J. Silvola K. Tolonen P.J. Martikainen (1998) ArticleTitleMethane fluxes on boreal peatlands of different fertility and effect of long-term experimental lowing of the water table on flux rates Global Biogeochem. Cycles 12 53–69 Occurrence Handle10.1029/97GB02732

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • A. Priemé S. Christensen (1997) ArticleTitleSeasonal and spatial variation of methane oxidation in a Danish spruce forest Soil Biol. Biochem. 29 1165–1172 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0038-0717(97)00038-2

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K.R. Reddy E.M. D’Angelo W.G. Harris (2000) Biogeochemistry of wetlands M.E. Sumner (Eds) Handbook of Soil Science CRC Press Boca Raton, London, New York, Washington DC G89–119

    Google Scholar 

  • T. Sawamoto K. Kusa R. Hu R. Hatano (2002) ArticleTitleDissolved N2O, CH4and CO2 in pipe drainageseepageand stream water in a livestock farm in HokkaidoJapan Soil Sci. Plant Nutri. 48 433–439

    Google Scholar 

  • N.J. Shurpali S.B. Verma R.J. Clement D.P. Billesbach (1993) ArticleTitleSeasonal distribution of methane flux in a Minnesota peatland measured by Eddy correlation J. Geophys. Res. 98 20649–20655

    Google Scholar 

  • K.L. Smith K.E. Dobbie B.C. Ball L.R. Bakken B.K. Sitaula S. Hansen R. Brumme W. Borken S. Christensen A. Priiemé D. Fowler J.A. MacDonald U. Skiba L. Klemedtsson A. Kasimir-Klemedtsson A. Degóska P. Orlanski (2000) ArticleTitleOxidation of atmospheric methane in Northern European soils, comparison with other ecosystems, and uncertainties in the global terrestrial sink Global Change Biol. 6 791–803 Occurrence Handle10.1046/j.1365-2486.2000.00356.x

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • L.K. Smith W.M. Lewis SuffixJr (1992) ArticleTitleSeasonally of methane emissions from five lakes and associated wetlands of Colorado Rockies Global Biogeochem. Cycles 6 323–338

    Google Scholar 

  • InstitutionalAuthorNameSoil Survey Staff (1999) Soil Taxonomy – A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys EditionNumber2 US Department of Agriculture Washington D.C. 869

    Google Scholar 

  • M. Sommer H. Thies E. Kolb H. Bächle K. Stahr (1997) ArticleTitleBiochemistry of a cirque-lake landscape - an interdisciplinary study in a catchment of the northern Black Forest Germany Water Resourc. Res. 33 2129–2142 Occurrence Handle10.1029/97WR01501

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • M. Sommer S. Fiedler (2002) Methane emissions from wetland soils in Southwest-Germany G. Broil W. Merbach E.-M. Pfeiffer (Eds) Wetlands in Central Europe Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 176–196

    Google Scholar 

  • P.A. Steudler R.D. Bowden J.M. Mellilo J.D. Aber (1989) ArticleTitleInfluence of nitrogen fertilization on methane uptake in temperate forest soils Nature 341 314–316 Occurrence Handle10.1038/341314a0

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • N. Tamai C. Takenaka S. Ishizuka T. Tezuka (2003) ArticleTitleMethane flux and regulatory variables in soils of three equal-aged Japanese cypress (Chamaecyaris obtusa) forests in central Japan Soil Biol. Biochem. 35 633–641 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0038-0717(03)00010-5

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • J.M. Tiedje (1982) Denitrification A.L. Page R.H. Miller D.R. Keeney (Eds) Methods of Soil Analysis, Part 2. Chemical and Microbiological Properties – Agronomy Monograph No. 9 Soil Science Society of America Madison 1011–1026

    Google Scholar 

  • N.T. Roulet A. Jano C.A. Kelly L.F. Klinger T.R. Moore R. Protz J.A. Ritter W.R. Rouse (1994) ArticleTitleRole of the Hudson Bay lowland as a source of atmospheric methane J. Geophy. Res. 99 1439–1454 Occurrence Handle10.1029/93JD00261

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R.C. Upstill-Goddard J. Barnes T. Frost S. Pushorn J.P. Owens (2000) ArticleTitleMethane in the southern North Sea: low-salinity inputs, estuarine removal, and atmospheric flux Global Biogeochem. Cycles 14 1205–1217 Occurrence Handle10.1029/1999GB001236

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • J.M. Waddington N.T. Roulet (1997) ArticleTitleGroundwater flow and dissolved carbon movement in a boreal peatland J. Hydrol. 191 122–138 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S0022-1694(96)03075-2

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R. Wassmann M.S. Aulakh R.S. Lantin H. Rennenberg J.B. Aduna (2002) ArticleTitleMethane emission patterns from rice fields planted to several rice cultivars for nine seasons Nutr. Cycles Agroecosyst. 64 111–124 Occurrence Handle10.1023/A:1021171303510

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Whalen S.C., Reeburgh W.S. and Reimers C.E. 1996. Control of tundra methane emission by microbial oxidation. In: Reynolds J.F. and Tenhunen H.D. (eds), Landscape Function and Disturbance in Arctic Tundra. Ecological Studies 120, pp. 257–274.

  • G.J. Whiting J.P. Chaton D.S. Bartlett J.D. Happell (1991) ArticleTitleRelationship between CH4 emission, biomass, CO2 exchange in a subtropical grassland J. Geophy. Res. 96 13067–13071

    Google Scholar 

  • J. Windsor T.R. Moore N.T. Roulet (1992) ArticleTitleEpisodic fluxes of methane from subarctic fens Can. J. Soil Sci. 72 441–452

    Google Scholar 

  • K.W. Yu Z.P. Wang A. Vermoesen P. Patrick SuffixJr. O. Cleemput Particlevan (2001) ArticleTitleNitrous oxide and methane emissions from different soil suspensions: effect of soil redox status Biol. Fertil. Soils. 34 25–30 Occurrence Handle10.1007/s003740100350

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to S. Fiedler.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Fiedler, S., Höll, B.S. & Jungkunst, H.F. Methane Budget of a Black Forest Spruce Ecosystem Considering Soil Pattern. Biogeochemistry 76, 1–20 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-005-5551-y

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-005-5551-y

Keywords

Navigation