Biodiversity and conservation of Phoenix canariensis: a review

Abstract

The Canarian date palm, Phoenix canariensis, is one of the most representative endemic plant species of the Canary Islands, although it is better known for its significant horticultural interest because it is one of the most appreciated ornamental trees of the subtropical and tropical worlds for its ability to grow on a wide range of site types. The naturally-occurring Canarian palm groves are the most important genetic reservoir of the species. This review aims to bring together the most important advances reached in the past three decades relative to the distribution, genetics and reproductive biology patterns of this species. Currently, P. canariensis palm groves are experiencing conservation problems such as the high pressure of human activities, and invasive pests, so it is appropriate to summarize all the current knowledge to make it available for incorporation into conservation strategies.

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Based on Rivera et al. 2020; Martínez-Rico 2017

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Acknowledgements

We want to thank all those people who in one way or another have collaborated in the realization of the different works that have allowed writing this article. Especially to Agustín Naranjo (University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria), Miguel Angel González (Jardín Botánico Canario Viera y Clavijo), Marco Márquez (Cabildo de Gran Canaria), Priscila Rodríguez and Leticia Curbelo (University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria), Francesco Salomone (City Council of La Laguna), Marco Díaz-Bertrana, Magui Olanga (Jardín Botánico Canario Viera y Clavijo) and Pedro Luis Pérez de Paz (University of La Laguna). This article has been possible thanks to the Fundación Cajacanarias which partially funded this research. Award Funding: 2018PATRI33. Thanks also to the Consejería de Emergencias y Medio Ambiente. Cabildo de Gran Canaria.

Funding

Part of this research was supported by Fundación Cajacanarias. Award Number: 2018 PATRI33. Recipient: Dr. Pedro A. Sosa.

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Sosa, P.A., Saro, I., Johnson, D. et al. Biodiversity and conservation of Phoenix canariensis: a review. Biodivers Conserv 30, 275–293 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-020-02096-1

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Keywords

  • Phoenix canariensis
  • Canary islands
  • Molecular markers
  • Conservation
  • Canarian date palm