Building capacity in biodiversity monitoring at the global scale

  • Dirk S. Schmeller
  • Monika Böhm
  • Christos Arvanitidis
  • Shannon Barber-Meyer
  • Neil Brummitt
  • Mark Chandler
  • Eva Chatzinikolaou
  • Mark J. Costello
  • Hui Ding
  • Jaime García-Moreno
  • Mike Gill
  • Peter Haase
  • Miranda Jones
  • Romain Juillard
  • William E. Magnusson
  • Corinne S. Martin
  • Melodie McGeoch
  • Jean-Baptiste Mihoub
  • Nathalie Pettorelli
  • Vânia Proença
  • Cui Peng
  • Eugenie Regan
  • Ute Schmiedel
  • John P. Simaika
  • Lauren Weatherdon
  • Carly Waterman
  • Haigen Xu
  • Jayne Belnap
Review Paper

Abstract

Human-driven global change is causing ongoing declines in biodiversity worldwide. In order to address these declines, decision-makers need accurate assessments of the status of and pressures on biodiversity. However, these are heavily constrained by incomplete and uneven spatial, temporal and taxonomic coverage. For instance, data from regions such as Europe and North America are currently used overwhelmingly for large-scale biodiversity assessments due to lesser availability of suitable data from other, more biodiversity-rich, regions. These data-poor regions are often those experiencing the strongest threats to biodiversity, however. There is therefore an urgent need to fill the existing gaps in global biodiversity monitoring. Here, we review current knowledge on best practice in capacity building for biodiversity monitoring and provide an overview of existing means to improve biodiversity data collection considering the different types of biodiversity monitoring data. Our review comprises insights from work in Africa, South America, Polar Regions and Europe; in government-funded, volunteer and citizen-based monitoring in terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. The key steps to effectively building capacity in biodiversity monitoring are: identifying monitoring questions and aims; identifying the key components, functions, and processes to monitor; identifying the most suitable monitoring methods for these elements, carrying out monitoring activities; managing the resultant data; and interpreting monitoring data. Additionally, biodiversity monitoring should use multiple approaches including extensive and intensive monitoring through volunteers and professional scientists but also harnessing new technologies. Finally, we call on the scientific community to share biodiversity monitoring data, knowledge and tools to ensure the accessibility, interoperability, and reporting of biodiversity data at a global scale.

Keywords

Biodiversity monitoring Paraecologists Citizen science Remote sensing New technologies 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dirk S. Schmeller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Monika Böhm
    • 3
  • Christos Arvanitidis
    • 4
  • Shannon Barber-Meyer
    • 5
    • 6
  • Neil Brummitt
    • 7
  • Mark Chandler
    • 8
  • Eva Chatzinikolaou
    • 3
  • Mark J. Costello
    • 9
  • Hui Ding
    • 10
  • Jaime García-Moreno
    • 11
  • Mike Gill
    • 12
  • Peter Haase
    • 13
    • 14
  • Miranda Jones
    • 15
    • 16
  • Romain Juillard
    • 17
  • William E. Magnusson
    • 18
  • Corinne S. Martin
    • 15
  • Melodie McGeoch
    • 19
  • Jean-Baptiste Mihoub
    • 1
  • Nathalie Pettorelli
    • 3
  • Vânia Proença
    • 20
  • Cui Peng
    • 10
  • Eugenie Regan
    • 21
  • Ute Schmiedel
    • 22
  • John P. Simaika
    • 13
  • Lauren Weatherdon
    • 15
  • Carly Waterman
    • 3
  • Haigen Xu
    • 10
  • Jayne Belnap
    • 23
  1. 1.Department of Conservation BiologyHelmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZLeipzigGermany
  2. 2.ECOLABUniversité de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPSToulouseFrance
  3. 3.Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR)Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and AquacultureHeraklionGreece
  5. 5.Scripps Institute of OceanographyUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  6. 6.US Geological SurveyNorthern Prairie Wildlife Research CenterJamestownUSA
  7. 7.Natural History MuseumLondonUnited Kingdom
  8. 8.Earthwatch InstituteBostonUSA
  9. 9.Institute of Marine ScienceUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  10. 10.Nanjing Institute of Environmental SciencesMinistry of Environmental ProtectionNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  11. 11.ESiLiArnhemNetherlands
  12. 12.Canadian High Arctic Research StationAboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaHullCanada
  13. 13.Department of River Ecology and ConservationSenckenberg Research Institute and Natural History MuseumGelnhausenGermany
  14. 14.Faculty of BiologyUniversity of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  15. 15.United Nations Environment World Conservation Monitoring CentreCambridgeUK
  16. 16.Changing Ocean Research Unit and Nereus Program, Fisheries CentreUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  17. 17.Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Département Ecologie et Gestion de la BiodiversitéUMR 7204 MNHN-CNRS Centre d’Ecologie et des Sciences de la ConservationParisFrance
  18. 18.Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da AmazôniaManausBrazil
  19. 19.School of Biological SciencesMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  20. 20.MARETEC, Instituto Superior TécnicoUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal
  21. 21.The Biodiversity ConsultancyCambridgeUK
  22. 22.University of Hamburg, Biocentre Klein Flottbek and Botanical GardenHamburgGermany
  23. 23.U.S. Geological SurveySouthwest Biological Science CenterMoabUSA

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