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Introduced non-hominid primates impact biodiversity and livelihoods: management priorities

Abstract

Non-hominid primates (NHPs) are some of the most understudied invasive mammals in terms of their impacts to biodiversity and the ability to successfully manage them, despite their having been implicated in numerous extinctions. We found 99 NHP populations of 37 species have been introduced on at least 67 islands and various mainland locations. NHPs have been implicated in at least 69 extinctions or extirpations. NHPs reduce human food security, display aggressive behavior sometimes resulting in human fatalities, and transmit diseases. We identified thirty islands where management is likely feasible and rank them by the potential biodiversity benefits of NHP management. At least eight attempts to eradicate NHP populations have been made with only one so far having been successful. Social considerations along with technological advancements in management methods are both needed to curb the impacts of NHPs and protect people and biodiversity on islands invaded by NHPs.

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Acknowledgements

Island Conservation, The University of Queensland, and Northern Illinois University funded staff time to compile this review. We thank Nick Holmes and two anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful comments on the manuscript.

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HPJ and KJC conceived of the research, performed the analyses, and wrote the paper, AMB amassed data and edited the paper, GSB and CCH edited the paper, and RAM contributed data and edited the paper.

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Correspondence to Holly P. Jones.

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Jones, H.P., Campbell, K.J., Burke, A.M. et al. Introduced non-hominid primates impact biodiversity and livelihoods: management priorities. Biol Invasions 20, 2329–2342 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-018-1704-5

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Keywords

  • Invasive mammals
  • Invasive species
  • Primates
  • Non-hominid primates
  • Island ecology
  • Eradication