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Biological Invasions

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 981–985 | Cite as

The 100th of the world’s worst invasive alien species

  • Gloria M. Luque
  • Céline Bellard
  • Cleo Bertelsmeier
  • Elsa Bonnaud
  • Piero Genovesi
  • Daniel Simberloff
  • Franck Courchamp
Invasion Note

Abstract

Biological invasions are among the greatest threats to global biodiversity, but in contrast to most other global threats, they suffer from specific communication issues. Our paper presents the first new addition to the widely cited IUCN list of “100 of the world’s worst invasive species”, a list created a decade ago in response to these communication issues. We briefly present this list, the recent removal of one species from that list, and the rationale to include a novel, 100th species to replace it. The new species of this list, giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta), was chosen by the community of invasion biologists (over 650 experts from over 60 countries). This new addition to the list will draw public attention to the damage caused by invasive alien species and it will help stimulate the necessary discussion of this critical issue in science and policy circles.

Keywords

Salvinia molesta Biological invasions ISSG 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gloria M. Luque
    • 1
  • Céline Bellard
    • 1
  • Cleo Bertelsmeier
    • 1
  • Elsa Bonnaud
    • 1
  • Piero Genovesi
    • 2
  • Daniel Simberloff
    • 3
  • Franck Courchamp
    • 1
  1. 1.Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, UMR CNRS 8079Univ Paris-SudOrsayFrance
  2. 2.Chair IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist GroupInstitute for Environmental Protection and ResearchRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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