Non-indigenous land and freshwater gastropods in Israel

Abstract

Few comprehensive works have investigated non-indigenous snails and slugs as a group. We compiled a database of non-indigenous gastropods in Israel to explore how they arrived and spread, characteristics of their introduction, and their biological traits. Fifty-two species of introduced gastropods are known from Israel (of which nine species subsequently went extinct): 19 species of freshwater snails and 33 species of terrestrial gastropods. The majority of these species are found only in human-dominated habitats. Most of those found in natural habitats are aquatic species. Most snails are introduced unintentionally from various parts of the Holoarctic region, reaching Israel as stowaways with horticultural imports and the aquarium trade, but some are brought intentionally to be used as pets or for food. Because the study of this group in Israel is very limited, information regarding their distribution in the country and their effects on other species is incomplete. Though only nine species of non-indigenous snails have been found to date in natural habitats, some of these are very abundant. More information and research is required to enable effective management schemes.

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Acknowledgments

We thank M. Algouati and Sh. Moran for valuable data and the internal university fund (Tel-Aviv University) for supporting this research.

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Correspondence to Uri Roll.

Appendix 1

Appendix 1

Interceptions by inspectors of the Plant Protection and Inspection Service of the Ministry of Agriculture of land and freshwater gastropods for which no specimens have been found so far in Israel

Taxon Family Terrestrial/freshwater Origin Year Remarks
Filopaludina martensi martensi (von Frauenfeld, 1865) Viviparidae Freshwater Thailand 2005/2006 For food
Filopaludina martensi cambodjensis (Mabille & Le Mesle, 1869) Viviparidae Freshwater Thailand 2006 For food
Pila ampullacea (Linnaeus, 1758) Ampullariidae Freshwater Thailand 2006/2007 For food
Digoniostoma truncata (Eydoux & Souleyet, 1852) Bithyniidae Freshwater Singapore/Hong Kong Pre-1979 On aquarium plants
Ameriana carinata (H. Adams, 1861) Planorbidae Freshwater Singapore/Hong Kong Pre-1979 On aquarium plants
Gyraulus convexiusculus (Hutton, 1842) Planorbidae Freshwater Singapore/Hong Kong Pre-1979 On aquarium plants
Planorbarius corneus (Linnaeus, 1758) Planorbidae Freshwater Germany 2002 On waterlilies
Planorbis planorbis planorbis (Linnaeus, 1758) Planorbidae Freshwater Germany 2002 On waterlilies
Succinea putris (Linnaeus, 1758) Succineidae Terrestrial Germany 2002 On waterlilies
Succinea striata (Krauss, 1848) Succineidae Terrestrial South Africa 2001 Among grapes
Gittenbergia sororcula (Benoit, 1859) Valloniidae Terrestrial “Netherlands” (France) 2002 On Sempervivum
Achatina achatina (Linnaeus, 1758) Achatinidae Terrestrial Ghana
Nigeria
“Netherlands” (Togo)
2001
2002
2007
As “pets”
As “pets”
On Codiaeum (Croton) cuttings
Discus rotundatus (Müller, 1774) Discidae Terrestrial Netherlands 2002 On Orchid
Oxychilus draparnaudi (Beck, 1837) Oxychilidae Terrestrial Belgium 1986 In potplants
Limax maximus Linnaeus, 1758 Limacidae Terrestrial Netherlands 2007 In Bromeliacea
Arion species Arionidae Terrestrial Netherlands 2001 On Sedum (specimen rotten)
Arianta arbustorum (Linnaeus, 1758) Helicidae Terrestrial Estonia 2007 In peat
Cernuella cisalpina (Rossmaessler, 1837) Hygromiidae Terrestrial “Cyprus” 2000 Among tomatoes
Cernuella neglecta (Draparnaud, 1805) Hygromiidae Terrestrial Spain 1987 In peat
Monacha parumcincta (Menke, 1828) Hygromiidae Terrestrial “Cyprus” 2000 Among tomatoes
  1. Pre-1979 identifications by the late Dr. L. Forcart (Basel), all other identifications by H. K. Mienis

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Roll, U., Dayan, T., Simberloff, D. et al. Non-indigenous land and freshwater gastropods in Israel. Biol Invasions 11, 1963–1972 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-008-9373-4

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Keywords

  • Biogeographic origin
  • Gastropods
  • Impact
  • Israel
  • Slugs
  • Snails