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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 39, Issue 7, pp 1079–1089 | Cite as

The function and magnetic resonance imaging of immature dendritic cells under ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-labeling

  • Wei Zhang
  • Shuihua Zhang
  • Wan Xu
  • Min Zhang
  • Quan Zhou
  • Wenli Chen
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effects of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) labeling on the maturity or immune tolerance of immature dendritic cells (imDCs) as the success of immunotherapy with immature dendritic cells is highly dependent on immune tolerance.

Results

The feasibility of tracking implanted USPIO-labeled imDCs in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was explored. The effects of USPIO labeling on the immune tolerance of imDCs was examined. USPIO when higher than 200 μg/ml caused considerable damage to imDCs, induced imDC maturation, and impacted the immune tolerance of imDCs. USPIO labeling caused a dose-dependent increase in autophagosome formation in imDCs, and autophagy inhibitors prevented the maturation of imDCs while stimulating their immune tolerance.

Conclusions

We speculate that high concentrations of USPIO can be used to induce imDC maturation, and that this process is likely mediated through an autophagy-related pathway.

Keywords

Autophagy Cell transplantation Immature dendritic cells Immune tolerance MRI Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81471659 and 81630046). USPIO was kindly provided by Professor Xu Yikai (Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nan Fang Hospital, Southern Medical University, No. 1838 Guangzhou Avenue North, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510515, China).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Zhang
    • 1
  • Shuihua Zhang
    • 2
  • Wan Xu
    • 1
  • Min Zhang
    • 1
  • Quan Zhou
    • 2
  • Wenli Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life ScienceSouth China Normal UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Medical Imaging CenterThe First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan UniversityGuangzhouChina

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