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Direct utilization of purple sweet potato by sake yeasts to produce an anthocyanin-rich alcoholic beverage

Abstract

Objective

To produce an alcoholic beverage containing anthocyanins that can act as antioxidants and have anticarcinogenic activities and antihypertensive effects.

Results

High starch-assimilating sake yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-expressing the glucoamylase and α-amylase genes from Debaryomyces occidentalis using the double rDNA-integration system was developed. The new strain grew substantially using 5 % (w/v) purple sweet potato flour as the sole carbon source. Its cell yield reached 14.5 mg ml−1 after 3 days. This value was 2.4-fold higher than that of the parental wild-type strain. It produced 12 % (v/v) ethanol from 20 % (w/v) purple sweet potato flour and consumed 98 % of the starch content in purple sweet potato flour after 5 days of fermentation.

Conclusion

We have produced a health-promoting alcoholic beverage abundant in anthocyanins from purple sweet potato.

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Correspondence to Suk Bai.

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Lee, JY., Im, YK., Ko, HM. et al. Direct utilization of purple sweet potato by sake yeasts to produce an anthocyanin-rich alcoholic beverage. Biotechnol Lett 37, 1439–1445 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-015-1811-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-015-1811-7

Keywords

  • Alcoholic beverage
  • Amylolytic sake yeasts
  • Anthocyanin
  • Purple sweet potato
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • Sake yeast
  • Starch