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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 32, Issue 8, pp 1059–1062 | Cite as

Immobilization of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase onto electrospun polyacrylonitrile fibers through physical adsorption and application to transesterification in nonaqueous solvent

  • Shinji SakaiEmail author
  • Yuping Liu
  • Tetsu Yamaguchi
  • Rie Watanabe
  • Masaaki Kawabe
  • Koei Kawakami
Original Research Paper

Abstract

The lipase of Pseudomonas cepacia was immobilized onto electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers and used for the conversion of (S)-glycidol with vinyl n-butyrate to glycidyl n-butyrate in isooctane. The rate of reaction with the adsorbed lipase was 23-fold higher than the initial material. After 10 recyclings, the initial reaction rate was 80% of the original rate. This system of enzyme immobilization is therefore suitable for carrying out transesterification reactions in nonaqueous solvents.

Keywords

Electrospinning Immobilization Lipase Nano-fibers Physical adsorption Transesterification 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by the “Collaborative Development of Innovative Seeds” grant program from the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shinji Sakai
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuping Liu
    • 2
  • Tetsu Yamaguchi
    • 3
  • Rie Watanabe
    • 4
  • Masaaki Kawabe
    • 4
  • Koei Kawakami
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityToyonakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringKyushu UniversityNishi-kuJapan
  3. 3.Biotechnology and Food Research InstituteFukuoka Industrial Technology CenterKurumeJapan
  4. 4.Japan Vilene Company, Ltd.KogaJapan

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