Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 31, Issue 10, pp 1613–1616 | Cite as

Cationic polyacrylamides enhance rates of starch and cellulose saccharification

  • John T. Reye
  • Kendra Maxwell
  • Swati Rao
  • Jian Lu
  • Sujit Banerjee
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Adding a cationic polyacrylamide (c-PAM) to either the amylase mediated hydrolysis of corn starch or the hydrolysis of wood fiber by cellulase can enhance the initial hydrolysis rates, although a rate decrease can occur under some conditions. Several c-PAMs can serve as catalysts and the same c-PAM can improve the efficiency of both amylase and cellulase. The initial amylase rate approximately doubles; the analogous cellulase hydrolysis rate increases by about 40%. c-PAMs increase the binding of enzyme to substrate.

Keywords

Amylase Cellulose Polymer c-PAM Binding Rate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John T. Reye
    • 1
  • Kendra Maxwell
    • 1
  • Swati Rao
    • 1
  • Jian Lu
    • 1
  • Sujit Banerjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Paper Science and Technology, School of Chemical & Biomolecular EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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