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A Novel TaqI Polymorphism in the Coding Region of the Ovine TNXB Gene in the MHC Class III Region: Morphostructural and Physiological Influences

Abstract

The tenascin-XB (TNXB) gene has antiadhesive effects, functions in matrix maturation in connective tissues, and localizes to the major histocompatibility complex class III region. We hypothesized that it may influence adaptive physiological response through an effect on blood vessel function. We identified a novel g.1324 A→G polymorphism at a TaqI recognition site in a 454 bp fragment of ovine TNXB and genotyped it in 150 Nigerian sheep using PCR-RFLP. The missense mutation changes glutamic acid (GAA) to glycine (GGA). Among SNP genotypes, significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed in body weight and fore cannon bone length. Interaction effects of breed, SNP genotype, and geographic location had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on chest girth. The SNP genotype was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with physiological traits of pulse rate and skin temperature. The observed effect of this novel polymorphism may be mediated through its role in connective tissue biology, requiring further association and functional studies.

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Acknowledgments

Financial support from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, is gratefully acknowledged.

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Correspondence to Ikhide G. Imumorin.

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Ajayi, O.O., Adefenwa, M.A., Agaviezor, B.O. et al. A Novel TaqI Polymorphism in the Coding Region of the Ovine TNXB Gene in the MHC Class III Region: Morphostructural and Physiological Influences. Biochem Genet 52, 1–14 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10528-013-9622-9

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Keywords

  • Tenascin-XB gene
  • Sheep
  • TaqI
  • Nigeria
  • Morphology
  • Physiological status