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Spatial Pattern and Fine-Scale Genetic Structure Indicating Recent Colonization of the Palm Euterpe edulis in a Brazilian Atlantic Forest Fragment

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Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge Dr. Jeffrey Joseph (RBG-Kew), for constructive comments on the manuscript, and the Brazilian agencies Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) and Conselho Nacional Pesquisa (CNPq), for providing a fellowship for F. A. Vieira and a research fellowship for Dulcinéia de Carvalho.

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Correspondence to Fábio de Almeida Vieira.

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de Almeida Vieira, F., de Carvalho, D., Higuchi, P. et al. Spatial Pattern and Fine-Scale Genetic Structure Indicating Recent Colonization of the Palm Euterpe edulis in a Brazilian Atlantic Forest Fragment. Biochem Genet 48, 96–103 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10528-009-9298-3

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Keywords

  • Inbreeding Depression
  • Genetic Bottleneck
  • Secondary Succession
  • Complete Spatial Randomness
  • Recent Colonization