Advertisement

Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 164, Issue 5, pp 601–604 | Cite as

fMRI Responses in Healthy Individuals and in Patients with Mild Depression to Presentation of Pleasant and Unpleasant Images

  • M. E. Mel’nikov
  • E. D. Petrovskii
  • D. D. Bezmaternykh
  • L. I. Kozlova
  • M. B. Shtark
  • A. A. Savelov
  • O. S. Shubina
  • K. A. Natarova
Article
  • 32 Downloads

Patients with mild depression and apparently healthy individuals were presented images and asked to sort them into “pleasant” and “unpleasant” subsets. In both groups, the main differences between brain activation patterns during presentation of pleasant and unpleasant images were localized in the motor regions (precentral and postcentral gyrus) and in the cerebellum (p<0.05 with FWE correction). Most likely, these clusters are associated with motion (pressing a button in accordance with the instruction). According to the data of intergroup contrasts, patients with depression had less pronounced activation of frontal structures (middle frontal gyrus and other areas, including the white matter) in response to both positive and negative images (p<0.001). In healthy subjects, the response of the temporo-occipital areas (lingual and fusiform gyrus) to unpleasant stimuli was more intensive than in patients (p<0.001). This can be due to differences in the semantic image processing. Thus, in case of mild depression, the response of the amygdaloid complex, the key structure in the development in affective disorder, was not always observed. At the same time, the response of frontal and temporo-occipital regions has a certain potential as a biomarker of mild depression, although the reliability of the obtained data requires additional confirmation.

Key Words

depression emotions fMRI 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Tumyalis AV, Aftanas LI. Contribution of neurophysiological endophenotype, individual frequency of EEG alpha oscillations, to mechanisms of emotional reactivity. Bull. Exp. Biol. Med. 2014;156(6):711-716.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Binder JR, Desai RH, Graves WW, Conant LL. Where is the semantic system? A critical review and meta-analysis of 120 functional neuroimaging studies. Cereb. Cortex. 2009;19(12):2767-2796.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Davey J, Thompson HE, Hallam G, Karapanagiotidis T, Murphy C, De Caso I, Krieger-Redwood K, Bernhardt BC, Smallwood J, Jefferies E. Exploring the role of the posterior middle temporal gyrus in semantic cognition: Integration of anterior temporal lobe with executive processes. Neuroimage. 2016;137:165-177.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gawryluk JR, Mazerolle EL, D’Arcy RC. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter? A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions. Front. Neurosci. 2014;(8):239. doi:  https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2014.00239.
  5. 5.
    Groenewold NA, Opmeer EM, de Jonge P, Aleman A, Costafreda SG. Emotional valence modulates brain functional abnormalities in depression: evidence from a meta-analysis of fMRI studies. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 2013;37(2):152-163.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Higo T, Mars RB, Boorman ED, Buch ER, Rushworth MF. Distributed and causal influence of frontal operculum in task control. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 2011;108(10):4230-4235.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Japee S, Holiday K, Satyshur MD, Mukai I, Ungerleider LG. A role of right middle frontal gyrus in reorienting of attention: a case study. Front. Syst. Neurosci. 2015;9:23. doi:  https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2015.00023.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jongen EM, Smulders FT, Ranson SM, Arts BM, Krabbendam L. Attentional bias and general orienting processes in bipolar disorder. J. Behav. Ther. Exp. Psychiatry. 2007;38(2):168-183.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Linden DE, Habes I, Johnston SJ, Linden S, Tatineni R, Subramanian L, Sorger B, Healy D, Goebel R. Real-time self-regulation of emotion networks in patients with depression. PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e38115. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0038115.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Palmer SM, Crewther SG, Carey LM; START Project Team. A meta-analysis of changes in brain activity in clinical depression. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 2015;8:1045. doi:  https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.01045.
  11. 11.
    Robins DL, Hunyadi E, Schultz RT. Superior temporal activation in response to dynamic audio-visual emotional cues. Brain Cogn. 2009;69(2):269-278.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Stoodley CJ, Schmahmann JD. Evidence for topographic organization in the cerebellum of motor control versus cognitive and affective processing. Cortex. 2010;46(7):831-844.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Stoodley CJ, Valera EM, Schmahmann JD. Functional topography of the cerebellum for motor and cognitive tasks: an fMRI study. Neuroimage. 2012;59(2):1560-1570.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Yuan H, Young KD, Phillips R, Zotev V, Misaki M, Bodurka J. Resting-state functional connectivity modulation and sustained changes after real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback training in depression. Brain Connect. 2014;4(9):690-701.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Mel’nikov
    • 1
    • 3
  • E. D. Petrovskii
    • 2
  • D. D. Bezmaternykh
    • 1
    • 3
  • L. I. Kozlova
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. B. Shtark
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. A. Savelov
    • 2
  • O. S. Shubina
    • 1
  • K. A. Natarova
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Institute of Molecular Biology and BiophysicsNovosibirskRussia
  2. 2.International Tomography Center, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of SciencesNovosibirskRussia
  3. 3.Novosibirsk State National Research UniversityNovosibirskRussia
  4. 4.International Institute of Psychology and PsychotherapyNovosibirskRussia

Personalised recommendations