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Measurement of Plasma Hemoglobin Peroxidase Activity

  • D. V. Grigorieva
  • I. V. GorudkoEmail author
  • A. V. Sokolov
  • O. V. Kosmachevskaya
  • A. F. Topunov
  • I. V. Buko
  • E. E. Konstantinova
  • S. N. Cherenkevich
  • O. M. Panasenko
METHODS

We described a spectrophotometric method for measuring hemoglobin peroxidase activity in human plasma using o-dianisidine (o-DA) as the substrate and myeloperoxidase specific inhibitor 4-aminobensoic acid hydrazide (ruling out the probable contribution of myeloperoxidase to the measured parameter value). The optimal conditions (pH 5.5; 2 mM H2O2) have been determined, at which hemoglobin makes the main contribution to plasma oxidation of o-DA. A signifi cant positive correlation between hemoglobin peroxidase activity measured by the spectrophotometric method and hemoglobin level measured by the pyridine hemochromogenic method has been detected (r=0.624; p<0.01) in plasma specimens from 16 donors. Plasma hemoglobin peroxidase activities were measured in healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. High plasma hemoglobin peroxidase activities in both groups of patients indicates disorders in the mechanisms of clearance of hemoglobin and its highly reactive derivatives and can serve as specifi c markers of diseases associated with oxidative stress.

Keywords

hemoglobin plasma peroxidase activity myeloperoxidase diabetes mellitus coronary heart disease 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. V. Grigorieva
    • 1
  • I. V. Gorudko
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. V. Sokolov
    • 2
  • O. V. Kosmachevskaya
    • 3
  • A. F. Topunov
    • 3
  • I. V. Buko
    • 4
  • E. E. Konstantinova
    • 4
  • S. N. Cherenkevich
    • 1
  • O. M. Panasenko
    • 2
  1. 1.Belarusian State UniversityMinskBelarus
  2. 2.Institute of Physicochemical MedicineFederal Biomedical Agency of RussiaMoscowRussia
  3. 3.A. N. Bach Institute of Biochemistrythe Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Cardiology Research and Practical CenterMinskBelarus

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