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18-Months operation of Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope: a highly stable photometric performance

Abstract

We here report the photometric performance of Lunar-based Ultraviolet telescope (LUT), the first robotic telescope working on the Moon, for its 18-months operation. In total, 17 IUE standards have been observed in 51 runs until June 2015, which returns a highly stable photometric performance during the past 18 months (i.e., no evolution of photometric performance with time). The magnitude zero point is determined to be \(17.53\pm0.05~\mbox{mag}\), which is not only highly consistent with the results based on its first 6-months operation, but also independent on the spectral type of the standard from which the magnitude zero point is determined. The implications of this stable performance is discussed, and is useful for next generation lunar-based astronomical observations.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the anonymous referee for his/her suggestions that improve the manuscript. The authors thank the outstanding work of the LUT team and support by the team from the ground system of the Change-3 mission. This study is supported by the Key Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (KGED-EW-603). JW is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11473036. MXM is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11203033.

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Correspondence to J. Wang.

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Wang, J., Meng, X.M., Han, X.H. et al. 18-Months operation of Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope: a highly stable photometric performance. Astrophys Space Sci 360, 10 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10509-015-2521-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10509-015-2521-2

Keywords

  • Space vehicles: instruments
  • Telescopes
  • Techniques: photometric
  • Ultraviolet: general