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Table 1 Comparison of demographic characteristics of transgender-identifying individuals in the 2015 US Transgender Survey (USTS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey (BRFSS) 2014–2017

From: One Size Does Not Fit All: In Support of Psychotherapy for Gender Dysphoria

  USTS, 2015a
Transgender (n = 27,715)
BRFSS, 2014–2017b
Transgender (n = 3075)
Characteristic
 Gender identity
  Transgender women (male to female) 33% 48%e
  Transgender men (female to male) 29% 30%e
  Non-binary/gender-non-conforming 38% 22%e
 Sexual orientationc
  Heterosexual 15% 69%
  Lesbian or gay 16% 10%
  Bisexual 14% 15%
  Otherd 55% 7%
 Age
  18–24 42% 22%
  25–44 42% 30%
  45–64 14% 32%
  65 + 2% 17%
 Race/ethnicity
  White, non-Hispanic 62% 55%
  Black, non-Hispanic 13% 16%
  Asian, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander 5% 5%
  Other, non-Hispanic 3% 5%
  Hispanic 17% 19%
 Education level
  Did not graduate high school 2% 21%
  Graduated high school 11% 33%
  Some college or technical school 40% 32%
  Graduated college or technical school 47% 14%
 Annual household income
  < 25,000 38% 39%
  25,000–49,999 24% 24%
  50,000 + 38% 37%
 Home ownership
  Own 16% 55%
  Rent 44% 35%
  Other arrangement 40% 10%
 Marital status
  Married or coupled 18% 46%
  Divorced, separated, or widowed 10% 21%
  Never married 72% 33%
  1. aUS Transgender Survey, 2015 (James et al., 2016). Weighted data
  2. bCDC BRFSS Survey, 2014–2017 (Baker, 2019). Weighted data
  3. cSexual orientation reported based on the respondent self-identification
  4. dCombines all the response options other than “homosexual,” “lesbian/gay,” or “bisexual.”
  5. eCalculated using 2014–2017 BRFSS data (CDC, 2014–2017). Weighted data