De-Scent with Modification: More Evidence and Caution Needed to Assess Whether the Loss of a Pheromone Signaling Protein Permitted the Evolution of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior in Primates

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Paul Vasey for his invitation to submit this commentary. CAS would like to thank Claudia Astorino, Eliot Chudyk, Cati Connell, Lynn Hallstein O’Brien, Cheryl Knott, Alyssa Kriekemeier, Stephanie Meredith, Roberta Micallef, Takeo Rivera, Rick W. A. Smith, Karen Warkentin, and the students of the Spring 2019 semester of BU’s Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program course Gender & Sexuality II, for numerous enjoyable discussions that have informed these perspectives.

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Schmitt, C.A., Garrett, E.C. De-Scent with Modification: More Evidence and Caution Needed to Assess Whether the Loss of a Pheromone Signaling Protein Permitted the Evolution of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior in Primates. Arch Sex Behav (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-019-01583-z

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