Archives as places, places as archives: doors to privilege, places of connection or haunted sarcophagi of crumbling skeletons?

Abstract

This paper considers place as a constitutive co-ingredient of records, of community recordkeeping systems and of community collective memory. In light of new understanding of the essential place of “place” in all elements of archival and recordkeeping processes, the impact of removal of records from within communities is discussed in terms of its potential for damage both to the community and the records. The significance of place to records and community memory highlights the importance of incorporating “place” as an element in archival and recordkeeping models, to make sure that it is taken into account when developing systems and carrying out processes. It also highlights the importance of ensuring that community records continue to be maintained in places of belonging for the community.

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    Taonga: Treasures handed down.

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Correspondence to Belinda Battley.

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Battley, B. Archives as places, places as archives: doors to privilege, places of connection or haunted sarcophagi of crumbling skeletons?. Arch Sci 19, 1–26 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10502-019-09300-4

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Keywords

  • Archives
  • Place
  • Records continuum theory
  • Records Continuum Model
  • Community archives
  • Recordkeeping
  • Collective memory
  • Indigenous archives