Aquaculture in Egypt: status, constraints and potentials

Abstract

Aquaculture is a globally important industry that provides essential food to a growing world population, with a major role in the supply of cheap animal protein. Very rapid developments have been occurred in aquaculture sector of Egypt in recent years and exhibited the strongest growth of any fisheries-related activity in the country. As a result, aquaculture is considered as the only viable option for reducing the current gap between production and consumption of fish in Egypt. The rapid expansion in support activities such as local feed mills and hatcheries made the sector more sophisticated and diverse. Globally, Egypt ranks 9th in fish farming production and 1st among African countries. The aquaculture is practiced in different production systems including semi-intensive, intensive culture in ponds, tanks, intensive production in cages and traditional extensive production systems, but has yet to be adequately documented. Despite the fact that the aquaculture sector in Egypt has witnessed a spectacular development, it has also created challenges with respect to environmental issues and sustainability. This review provides an overview of the status and the perspectives of Egyptian aquaculture sector.

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Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge Dr. Mohamed Z. Baromah of the National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, for his help with obtaining information.

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Correspondence to Naglaa F. Soliman.

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Soliman, N.F., Yacout, D.M.M. Aquaculture in Egypt: status, constraints and potentials. Aquacult Int 24, 1201–1227 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10499-016-9989-9

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Keywords

  • Aquaculture industry
  • Egypt
  • Constrains
  • Environmental impacts