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Aquaculture International

, Volume 19, Issue 6, pp 1193–1206 | Cite as

Effect of combined shrimp and rice farming on water and soil quality in Bangladesh

  • Md. Arif ChowdhuryEmail author
  • Yahya Khairun
  • Md. Salequzzaman
  • Md. Mizanur Rahman
Original Research

Abstract

This study analyzed water and soil quality and environmental impacts of shrimp farming in the southwestern coastal region of Bangladesh. Shrimp farming in the region is very traditional in nature where two culture systems viz. shrimp–rice and shrimp-only are being practiced, which are characterized by lower production, repeated stocking, irregular feeding, and fertilizing. Water quality in both farming systems was found suitable for optimum growth and survival of shrimp (Penaeus spp.). The level of 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5) in both systems even in canal water was within the recommended level provided by the Government of Bangladesh which is less than 5 mg/l. Therefore, effluents of shrimp farms in the study area did not show any nutrient pollution on the surrounding environment. However, saltwater intrusion has caused many problems like loss of agricultural production, reduced availability of fodder for livestock, and fresh water for domestic uses in the coastal region. The findings of this study confirmed that shrimp farming using saline water have long-term effect of soil salinization. As a result, it poses a real threat toward sustainability of coastal shrimp farming as well as coastal development in Bangladesh.

Keywords

Shrimp farming Effluents Environmental impact Salinization Water and soil quality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Md. Arif Chowdhury
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yahya Khairun
    • 2
  • Md. Salequzzaman
    • 3
  • Md. Mizanur Rahman
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Marine and Coastal Studies (CEMACS)Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)Pulau PinangMalaysia
  2. 2.Centre for Marine and Coastal Studies & School of Biological SciencesUniversiti Sains MalaysiaPulau PinangMalaysia
  3. 3.Environmental Science DisciplineKhulna UniversityKhulnaBangladesh
  4. 4.Department of Soil ScienceBangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural UniversitySalna, Gazipur 1706Bangladesh

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