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Network centrality and negative ties in feminine and masculine occupations

Abstract

Negative ties and gender (as a contextual variable) have remained under-studied in the social networks research in management. Drawing on occupational gender-typing theory, the paper hypothesizes that the relationship between indegree centrality of employees in a positive ties-based network and their tendency to cite their colleagues in negative ties differs in a feminine and a masculine occupation. Using network data from two organizations in India, the paper shows that in a feminine occupation (nursing), the higher the indegree centrality of the employees in a positive ties-based network, the less likely are they to cite negative ties whereas, in a masculine occupation (mining), the higher the indegree centrality of the employees in a positive ties-based network, more likely are they to cite negative ties. We make a theoretical contribution by extending the occupational gender-typing theory in social networks research by theorizing and examining the distinctive effects of the context – feminine and masculine occupations – on networks and work relations. We also discuss the managerial implications of the study.

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Data availability

The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author, upon reasonable request.

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Doshi, V., Mukherjee, S. & Yang, Y. Network centrality and negative ties in feminine and masculine occupations. Asia Pac J Manag (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10490-021-09785-7

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Keywords

  • Gender
  • Social networks
  • Feminine occupations
  • Masculine occupations
  • Negative ties; India