The Relationship Between Race, Patient Activation, and Working Alliance: Implications for Patient Engagement in Mental Health Care

  • Johanne Eliacin
  • Jessica M. Coffing
  • Marianne S. Matthias
  • Diana J. Burgess
  • Matthew J. Bair
  • Angela L. Rollins
Original Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10488-016-0779-5

Cite this article as:
Eliacin, J., Coffing, J.M., Matthias, M.S. et al. Adm Policy Ment Health (2016). doi:10.1007/s10488-016-0779-5

Abstract

This study explored the relationship between race and two key aspects of patient engagement—patient activation and working alliance—among a sample of African-American and White veterans (N = 152) seeking medication management for mental health conditions. After adjusting for demographics, race was significantly associated with patient activation, working alliance, and medication adherence scores. Patient activation was also associated with working alliance. These results provide support for the consideration of race and ethnicity in facilitating patient engagement and patient activation in mental healthcare. Minority patients may benefit from targeted efforts to improve their active engagement in mental healthcare.

Keywords

Patient activation Patient engagement Mental health African-Americans 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research and Development Service
  • PPO 13-395
Department of Veterans Affairs, Center for Innovation
  • CIN 13-416
Department of Veterans Affairs, Center for Health Information and Communication

    Copyright information

    © Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2016

    Authors and Affiliations

    • Johanne Eliacin
      • 1
      • 2
      • 3
      • 4
    • Jessica M. Coffing
      • 1
    • Marianne S. Matthias
      • 1
      • 3
      • 5
      • 8
    • Diana J. Burgess
      • 6
      • 7
    • Matthew J. Bair
      • 1
      • 3
      • 8
      • 9
    • Angela L. Rollins
      • 1
      • 2
      • 3
      • 4
    1. 1.Center for Health Information and Communication, CHIC, Health Services Research & DevelopmentRichard L. Roudebush VA Medical CenterIndianapolisUSA
    2. 2.Department of PsychologyIndiana University Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA
    3. 3.Center for Health Services ResearchRegenstrief Institute, Inc.IndianapolisUSA
    4. 4.ACT Center of IndianaIndianapolisUSA
    5. 5.Communication StudiesIndiana University Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA
    6. 6.Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research (CCDOR)Minneapolis VA Health Care SystemMinnesotaUSA
    7. 7.Department of MedicineUniversity of MinnesotaMinnesotaUSA
    8. 8.Indiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
    9. 9.Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes ResearchIndianapolisUSA

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