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Effective Intervention Programming: Improving Maternal Adjustment Through Parent Education

Abstract

This study assessed the secondary effects of a parent training intervention program on maternal adjustment, with a focus on understanding ways in which program efficacy differed for participants as a function of whether or not their children had behavior problems. Mothers (N = 99) of toddlers (2–3 years of age) were randomly assigned to receive one of three levels of intervention: (1) informational booklet (2) booklet + face-to-face parent training sessions, or (3) booklet + web-based parent training sessions. Findings indicated that all levels of intervention were associated with increases in maternal well-being for participants with typically developing children. Mothers of toddlers with behavior problems, however, did not benefit from receiving only the booklet but significantly benefitted from receiving either the face-to-face or web-based interventions. Findings are discussed in terms of efficient and efficacious program dissemination and the resulting implications for public policy.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of Health and Human Services (HHS) award # 90XP0056/01. Authors Bert and Farris were predoctoral trainees on NIH grant # HD-07184 at the time the intervention was administered, and would like to acknowledge Christina Stile, John G. Borkowski, Sharon L. Ramey, and all other contributors to Adventures in Parenting.

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Correspondence to Jaelyn R. Farris.

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Farris, J.R., Bert, S.S.C., Nicholson, J.S. et al. Effective Intervention Programming: Improving Maternal Adjustment Through Parent Education. Adm Policy Ment Health 40, 211–223 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10488-011-0397-1

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Keywords

  • Maternal socioemotional adjustment
  • Child behavior
  • Parent education