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Implementing an Evidence-Based Parenting Program in Community Agencies: What Helps and What Gets in the Way?

  • Veronica Asgary-EdenEmail author
  • Catherine M. Lee
Original Paper

Abstract

Adoption of evidence-based programs for families by community agencies requires an understanding of variables that influence implementation. Managers and service providers from 64 community agencies reported on variables that affected the implementation of Triple P, an evidence-based parenting program. Both types of stakeholders reported adequate office resources; over half the managers and over two-thirds of service providers reported adequate training. Adequate office resources and positive agency characteristics, including organizational climate, were associated with higher program usage. Service providers’ reports of the variables impacted their individual adherence rates; managers had broader perspectives of the quality of implementation in their organizations.

Keywords

Adherence Program usage Service delivery Parenting intervention Implementation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The data for this study were collected in partial completion of the first author’s doctoral dissertation. We would like to thank our colleagues in the Evidence-Based Parenting Research Working Group (Sue Barnes, Brian Beech, Sandra Cunning, Fred Schmidt, and Susan Stern) for their helpful suggestions throughout the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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