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Neurofeedback Training as a New Method in Treatment of Crystal Methamphetamine Dependent Patients: A Preliminary Study

Abstract

This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of neurofeedback (NFB) plus pharmacotherapy with pharmacotherapy alone, on addiction severity, mental health, and quality of life in crystal methamphetamine-dependent (CMD) patients. The study included 100 CMD patients undergoing a medical treatment who volunteered for this randomized controlled trial. After being evaluated by a battery of questionnaires that included addiction severity index questionnaire, Symptoms Check List 90 version, and World Health Organization Quality of Life, the participants were randomly assigned to an experimental or a control group. The experimental group received thirty 50-min sessions of NFB in addition to their usual medication over a 2-month period; meanwhile, the control group received only their usual medication. In accordance with this study’s pre-test–post-test design, both study groups were evaluated again after completing their respective treatment regimens. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed the experimental group to have lower severity of addiction, better psychological health, and better quality of life in than the control group. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. These finding suggest that NFB can be used to improve the effectiveness of treatment results in CMD patients.

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Correspondence to F. Dehghani-Arani.

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Rostami, R., Dehghani-Arani, F. Neurofeedback Training as a New Method in Treatment of Crystal Methamphetamine Dependent Patients: A Preliminary Study. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 40, 151–161 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10484-015-9281-1

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Keywords

  • Crystal methamphetamine dependency
  • Neurofeedback
  • Addiction severity
  • Mental health
  • Quality of life
  • Effectiveness