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Applied Mathematics and Mechanics

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 99–110 | Cite as

Peridynamic modelling of impact damage in three-point bending beam with offset notch

  • Ning LiuEmail author
  • Dahsin Liu
  • Wu Zhou
Article

Abstract

The nonlocal peridynamic theory has been proven to be a promising method for the material failure and damage analyses in solid mechanics. Based upon the integrodifferential equations, peridynamics enables predicting the complex fracture phenomena such as spontaneous crack nucleation and crack branching, curving, and arrest. In this paper, the bond-based peridynamic approach is used to study the impact damage in a beam with an offset notch, which is widely used to investigate the mixed I-II crack propagation in brittle materials. The predictions from the peridynamic analysis agree well with available experimental observations. The numerical results show that the dynamic fracture behaviors of the beam under the impact load, such as crack initiation, curving, and branching, rely on the location of the offset notch and the impact speed of the drop hammer.

Keywords

peridynamics impact damage crack propagation fracture mode 

Chinese Library Classification

O34 

2010 Mathematics Subject Classification

74A40 74A60 

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Copyright information

© Shanghai University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringNanjing University of Science and TechnologyNanjingChina
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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