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American Journal of Dance Therapy

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 79–92 | Cite as

Reading and Understanding Qualitative Research

  • Robyn Flaum Cruz
  • Jennifer Frank Tantia
Article

Abstract

For the dance/movement therapy clinician, reading research to keep up with current knowledge and trends is an important professional development activity that can sometimes seem daunting. Reading research can require a shift of focus, and include technical concepts and language that are different from those of clinical practice. However, professional reading can be enjoyable and rewarding when one feels confident in interpreting research findings. This article aims to offer skills to clinicians with a specific focus on how to read and interpret research that uses qualitative methods. To that end, parallels between research and practice are suggested to help align the reader with the values of qualitative research and how it can be used to enrich clinical practice. We present an overview of the types of qualitative research and necessary components to expect in a clearly written qualitative study. Detailed criteria for use in discerning integrity and validation strategies to use to examine credibility in a qualitative research study are presented and discussed. Brief examples are used to illustrate criteria presented, and a special section on how to appropriately apply qualitative research findings to clinical dance/movement therapy practice is included.

Keywords

Dance/movement therapy Qualitative research Qualitative methods 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that we have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© American Dance Therapy Association 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lesley UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.New YorkUSA

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