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Dance/Movement Therapy as an Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is one of the most common forms of developmental disabilities of childhood, rooted in atypical language and social development, in conjunction with repetitive and patterned behaviors. It is also suggested that gross and fine motor impairments are a core feature of ASD, are more prevalent in comparison to the general population, and may be further exaggerated due to reduced participation in physical activity. As awareness for ASD has increased, so have the number of therapeutic approaches; however, no single intervention has proven beneficial in alleviating the cardinal symptoms of ASD. Therefore the most effective treatment or combination of treatments remains inconclusive. Creative movement and dance is a practical and feasible option for children with ASD. However, there exists a dearth of literature evaluating dance/movement therapy (DMT) for children with ASD, despite providing both physical and psychological benefits for children with ASD. This article aims to perform a narrative review of the literature.

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Correspondence to Sara M. Scharoun.

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Scharoun, S.M., Reinders, N.J., Bryden, P.J. et al. Dance/Movement Therapy as an Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Am J Dance Ther 36, 209–228 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10465-014-9179-0

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