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Digital Animation as a Method to Disseminate Research Findings to the Community Using a Community-Based Participatory Approach

Abstract

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has garnered increasing interest over the previous two decades as researchers have tackled increasingly complex health problems. In academia, professional presentations and articles are major ways that research is disseminated. However, dissemination of research findings to the people and communities who participated in the research is many times forgotten. In addition, little scholarly literature is focused on creative dissemination of research findings to the community using CBPR methods. We seek to fill this gap in the literature by providing an exemplar of research dissemination and partnership strategies that were used to complete this project. In this paper, we present a novel approach to the dissemination of research findings to our targeted communities through digital animation. We also provide the foundational thinking and specific steps that were taken to select this specific dissemination product development and distribution strategy.

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Acknowledgments

Funding for this work was provided by the cooperative agreement number 5 U49 CE001093 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We would like to acknowledge the following PCVPC team members for their work with this dissemination project, including: LaVelle King, Alvin Rucker, Crystal Wyatt, Nigell Hester, Portia Thomas, Saburah Abdul-Kabir, and Anna Hargrove. We would also like to acknowledge the work of the additional members of the Communication and Dissemination and Research Cores of the Center who include Steve Leff, PhD, Tom Henry, and Ayana Bradshaw. We would like to thank ACHIEVEability and Ahmad Ajouz of Digital Media Graphix. We would also like to thank the youth and adults that participated in the focus groups as well as voiced the animated vignettes. Finally, we would like to thank the PCVPC Community and Youth Advisory Boards for their continued feedback and dedication to the process of dissemination.

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Correspondence to Therese S. Richmond.

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Vaughn, N.A., Jacoby, S.F., Williams, T. et al. Digital Animation as a Method to Disseminate Research Findings to the Community Using a Community-Based Participatory Approach. Am J Community Psychol 51, 30–42 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-012-9498-6

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  • Research dissemination
  • Digital animation
  • Community based participatory research
  • Youth violence