Construct Validity Supports Use of a Novel, Tablet-Based Neurocognitive Assessment for Adolescents and Young Adults Affected by Perinatal HIV from Vulnerable Communities in the United States

Abstract

Construct validity of novel tablet-based neurocognitive tests (in the NeuroScreen app) measuring processing speed, working memory, and executive functioning in adolescents and young adults (AYA) living with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) and perinatal HIV-exposure without infection (PHEU) was examined. Sixty-two AYA (33 PHIV, 29 PHEU) were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study (CASAH) in New York City. Medium to large and statistically significant correlations were found between NeuroScreen and gold standard, paper-and-pencil tests of processing speed, working memory, and executive functioning. Results provide partial support for NeuroScreen as an alternative to cumbersome paper-and-pencil tests for assessing neurocognition among HIV-affected AYA.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health under Grant R01 MH069133, PI: Mellins; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development under Grants R21 HD084197, PI: Robbins and R01 HD095266, PI: Robbins; National Institute of Nursing Research Grant R21 NR015009, PI: Robbins; the National Institute of Mental Health under Grant P30 MH043520, PI: Remien, and T32 MH19139, PI: Sandfort.

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Correspondence to R. N. Robbins.

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Robbins, R.N., Kluisza, L., Liu, J. et al. Construct Validity Supports Use of a Novel, Tablet-Based Neurocognitive Assessment for Adolescents and Young Adults Affected by Perinatal HIV from Vulnerable Communities in the United States. AIDS Behav 25, 1185–1191 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-020-03099-3

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Keywords

  • Neurocognitive impairment
  • Perinatal HIV infection
  • Neurocognitive assessment
  • NeuroScreen
  • Construct validity