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Behavioral and Cardiovascular Effects of a Behavioral Weight Loss Program for People Living with HIV

Abstract

We recently reported that a 12-week internet weight loss program produced greater weight losses than education control in overweight/obese people living with HIV (PLWH) (4.4 kg vs 1.0 kg; p < 0.05). This manuscript presents the changes in diet, physical activity, behavioral strategies, and cardio-metabolic parameters. Participants (N = 40; 21 males, 19 females) were randomly assigned to an internet behavioral weight loss (WT LOSS) program or internet education control (CONTROL) and assessed before and after the 12-week program. Compared to CONTROL, the WT LOSS arm reported greater use of behavioral strategies, decreases in intake (− 681 kcal/day; p = 0.002), modest, non-significant, increases in daily steps (+ 1079 steps/day) and improvements on the Healthy Eating Index. There were no significant effects on cardio-metabolic parameters. The study suggests that a behavioral weight loss program increases the use of behavioral strategies and modestly improves dietary intake and physical activity in PLWH. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up are needed.

Clinical Trials Registration: NCT02421406.

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Acknowledgements

We wish to thank Whitney Howie for her contribution to the dietary analyses. This project was supported by the Providence/Boston Center for AIDS Research (Grant Number P30 A1042853); the ACTG Clinical Research Site 2951 (The Miriam Hospital; Grant Number UM1AI069412); and the Cardiovascular Behavioral and Preventive Medicine Training Grant (Grant Number KB T32 HL076134).

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Correspondence to Rena R. Wing.

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Wing, R.R., Becofsky, K., Wing, E.J. et al. Behavioral and Cardiovascular Effects of a Behavioral Weight Loss Program for People Living with HIV. AIDS Behav 24, 1032–1041 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-019-02503-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-019-02503-x

Keywords

  • Weight loss
  • Diet quality
  • Physical activity
  • Behavior