The Impact of Cell Phone Support on Psychosocial Outcomes for Youth Living with HIV Nonadherent to Antiretroviral Therapy

Abstract

Mobile health interventions to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy among adolescents and young adults living with HIV represent a promising strategy. This pilot study (N = 37) evaluated the psychosocial impacts of an efficacious adherence intervention, cell phone support (CPS). Participants receiving CPS reported significant decreases in perceived stress, depression, and illicit substance use, and increases in self-efficacy during at least one study assessment period, in comparison to participants receiving usual care. Future research using a larger sample should test for mediators of treatment efficacy to further characterize how cell phone interventions impact adherence.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by The Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) from the National Institutes of Health [U01 HD 040533; U01 HD 040474] through the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (B. Kapogiannis), with supplemental funding from the National Institutes on Drug Abuse (N. Borek) and Mental Health (P. Brouwers, S. Allison). The study was reviewed by the ATN’s Behavioral Leadership Group. Additional support was provided by the ATN Coordinating Center (C. Wilson, C. Partlow) at The University of Alabama at Birmingham, and the ATN Data and Operations Center at Westat, Inc. (J. Korelitz, B. Driver). We acknowledge the contribution of the investigators and staff at: University of South Florida, Tampa (Emmanuel, Straub, Enriquez-Bruce), Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (Belzer, Tucker), Children’s National Medical Center (D’Angelo, Trexler), Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (Douglas, Tanney), John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County and the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center (Martinez, Henry-Reid, Bojan), Montefiore Medical Center (Futterman, Campos), Tulane University Health Sciences Center (Abdalian, Kozina), University of Miami School of Medicine (Friedman, Maturo), St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital (Flynn, Dillard), Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital (Paul, Head); Wayne State University (Secord, Outlaw, Cromer); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Agwu, Sanders, Anderson); The Fenway Institute (Mayer, Dormitzer); and University of Colorado (Reirden, Chambers). We sincerely thank the ATN 078 Protocol Team Members (Steven Asch, M.D., Aditya Gaur, M.D., Sue Ellen Abdalian, M.D., Esmine Leonard, BSN, Trina Jeanjacques, BA, Catherine Forbes, PhD). The authors acknowledge the contributions of the youth at the ATN sites that participated in the research.

Funding

This work was funded by The Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) from the National Institutes of Health [U01 HD 040533; U01 HD 040474] through the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (B. Kapogiannis), with supplemental funding from the National Institutes on Drug Abuse (N. Borek) and Mental Health (P. Brouwers, S. Allison).

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Correspondence to Caitlin S. Sayegh.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Sayegh, C.S., MacDonell, K.K., Clark, L.F. et al. The Impact of Cell Phone Support on Psychosocial Outcomes for Youth Living with HIV Nonadherent to Antiretroviral Therapy. AIDS Behav 22, 3357–3362 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2192-4

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Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • HIV
  • Adherence
  • Technology
  • Stress
  • Depression
  • Substance use
  • Self-efficacy