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Preferences for Sexual Health Smartphone App Features Among Gay and Bisexual Men

  • Ana Ventuneac
  • Steven A. John
  • Thomas H. F. Whitfield
  • Brian Mustanski
  • Jeffrey T. Parsons
Original Paper

Abstract

Given the popularity of geosocial networking applications (“apps”) among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM), this study sought to examine GBMSM’s willingness to use sexual health and behavior tracking features if integrated within apps they are already using to meet sexual partners. Most GBMSM (91%) recruited on a popular app reported interest in one or more sexual health app features, including features to find LGBT-friendly providers (83%), receive lab results (68%), schedule appointment reminders (67%), chat with a healthcare provider (59%), and receive medication reminder alerts (42%). Fewer GBMSM were interested in tracking and receiving feedback on their sexual behavior (35%) and substance use (24%). Our data suggest that integrating sexual health and behavior tracking features for GBMSM who use apps could be promising in engaging them in HIV prevention interventions. Further research is needed on GBMSM’s perspectives about potential barriers in using such features.

Keywords

MSM HIV prevention Sexual health Mobile technology Smartphone app 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Data for this study were collected in concert with online recruitment efforts for the Keep It Up! randomized controlled trial funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01DA035145, PI: Mustanski). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors would like to give special thanks to Krystal Madkins and Craig Sineath for managing the advertisement campaign, Katie Andrews for survey programming and data management, and Mark Pawson and Ruben Jimenez for their contributions to the project.

Funding

This study was funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01DA035145, PI: Mustanski).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Ana Ventuneac, Steven A. John, Thomas H. F. Whitfield, Brian Mustanski, and Jeffrey T. Parsons declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the Ethical Standards of the Institutional and/or National Research Committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Ventuneac
    • 1
  • Steven A. John
    • 2
  • Thomas H. F. Whitfield
    • 2
    • 3
  • Brian Mustanski
    • 4
  • Jeffrey T. Parsons
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Infectious DiseasesIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.The Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies & Training (CHEST)New YorkUSA
  3. 3.Health Psychology and Clinical Science Doctoral ProgramThe Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY)New YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medical Social Sciences and Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and WellbeingNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyHunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY)New YorkUSA

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