AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 1288–1298 | Cite as

Exploring Patterns of Awareness and Use of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

  • Benjamin B. Strauss
  • George J. Greene
  • Gregory PhillipsII
  • Ramona Bhatia
  • Krystal Madkins
  • Jeffrey T. Parsons
  • Brian Mustanski
Original Paper

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has shown promise as a safe and effective HIV prevention strategy, but there is limited research on awareness and use among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Using baseline data from the “Keep It Up! 2.0” randomized control trial, we examined differences in PrEP awareness and use among racially diverse YMSM (N = 759; mean age = 24.2 years). Participants were recruited from study sites in Atlanta, Chicago, and New York City, as well as through national advertising on social media applications. While 67.5 % of participants reported awareness of PrEP, 8.7 % indicated using the medication. Awareness, but not use, varied by demographic variables. PrEP-users had twice as many condomless anal sex partners (ERR = 2.05) and more condomless anal sex acts (ERR = 1.60) than non-users. Future research should aim to improve PrEP awareness and uptake among YMSM and address condom use.

Keywords

Homosexuality, male Pre-exposure prophylaxis Primary health care Risk reduction Behavior Sexual behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing and Department of Medical Social SciencesNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Preventive MedicineNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  4. 4.HIV/STI Services DivisionChicago Department of Public HealthChicagoUSA
  5. 5.Center for HIV Educational Studies and Training (CHEST)Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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