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Changes in Substance Use Symptoms Across Adolescence in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV

Abstract

The paper utilizes data collected at three time points in a longitudinal study of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and a comparison group of perinatally exposed but HIV-uninfected (PHEU) youths in the United States (N = 325). Using growth curve modeling, the paper examines changes in substance use symptoms among PHIV+ and PHEU youths as they transition through adolescence, and assesses the individual and contextual factors associated with the rate of change in substance use symptoms. Findings indicate that substance use symptoms increased over time among PHIV+ youths, but not among PHEU youths. The rate of change in these symptoms was positively associated with an increasing number of negative life events. Study findings underscore the need for early, targeted interventions for PHIV+ youths, and interventions to reduce adversities and their deleterious effects in vulnerable populations.

Resumen

Este manuscrito utiliza datos recogidos como parte de en un estudio longitudinal de jóvenes infectados por el VIH durante el período perinatal (PHIV+) y un grupo de contraste compuesto por jóvenes expuestos al VIH de forma perinatal expuestos pero no infectados (PHEU) en los Estados Unidos (N = 325). Utilizando un modelo de curvas de crecimiento, el estudio examina los cambios en los síntomas de consumo de sustancias entre los jóvenes PHIV+ y PHEU durante su transición en la adolescencia, y evalúa los factores individuales y contextuales asociados a la tasa de cambio en los síntomas de consumo de sustancias. Los resultados indican que los síntomas de consumo de sustancias aumentaron con el tiempo entre los jóvenes PHIV+ , pero no entre los jóvenes PHEU. El cambio en estos síntomas se asoció positivamente con un mayor número de eventos negativos de vida. Los resultados del estudio enfatizan la necesidad de desarrollar intervenciones dirigidas para jóvenes PHIV+ temprano en la adolescencia, al igual que el desarrollo de intervenciones para reducir las adversidades y sus efectos deletéreos en poblaciones vulnerables.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by a Grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (R01-MH63636; PI: Claude Ann Mellins, Ph.D.), and a center Grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to the HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University (P30MH43520; Center PI: Robert H Remien, Ph.D.).

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Mutumba, M., Elkington, K.S., Bauermeister, J.A. et al. Changes in Substance Use Symptoms Across Adolescence in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV. AIDS Behav 21, 1117–1128 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1468-9

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Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Stress
  • People living with HIV
  • Drug use