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Reasons People Give for Using (or Not Using) Condoms

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Abstract

Study participants (N = 348) were asked about 46 reasons that have been suggested for why people use or do not use condoms. Participants were asked which of these reasons motivated them when they were deciding whether to use condoms in 503 sexual relationships. Participants were classified into one of three roles based on their HIV status and the status of each sexual partner: HIV+ people with HIV− partners; HIV− people with HIV+ partners; and HIV− people with HIV− partners. Motivations were looked at in the context of each of these roles. Of the 46 reasons, only 15 were selected by at least 1/3 of the participants, and only seven were selected by at least half. Frequently reported reasons primarily concern protecting self and partner from STDs including HIV. Less frequently reported reasons involved social norms, effects of condoms on sex, and concern for the relationship. These findings have implications for clinical interventions.

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Acknowledgments

Work on this paper was supported in part by grant R01 HD055826 from the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, principal investigator David C. Bell. We would like to thank the reviewers for their helpful critique. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the authors.

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All procedures performed involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments of comparable ethical standards.

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IRB approval included a waiver of consent for named partners who were not themselves interviewed under condition that that their identifying information be treated with the same confidentially protections as interviewed participants.

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Farrington, E.M., Bell, D.C. & DiBacco, A.E. Reasons People Give for Using (or Not Using) Condoms. AIDS Behav 20, 2850–2862 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1352-7

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