AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 20, Issue 9, pp 1863–1882 | Cite as

HPTN 068: A Randomized Control Trial of a Conditional Cash Transfer to Reduce HIV Infection in Young Women in South Africa—Study Design and Baseline Results

  • Audrey Pettifor
  • Catherine MacPhail
  • Amanda Selin
  • F. Xavier Gómez-Olivé
  • Molly Rosenberg
  • Ryan G. Wagner
  • Wonderful Mabuza
  • James P. Hughes
  • Chirayath Suchindran
  • Estelle Piwowar-Manning
  • Jing Wang
  • Rhian Twine
  • Tamu Daniel
  • Philip Andrew
  • Oliver Laeyendecker
  • Yaw Agyei
  • Stephen Tollman
  • Kathleen Kahn
  • The HPTN 068 protocol team
Original Paper

Abstract

Young women in South Africa are at high risk for HIV infection. Cash transfers offer promise to reduce HIV risk. We present the design and baseline results from HPTN 068, a phase III, individually randomized trial to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV acquisition among South African young women. A total of 2533 young women were randomized to receive a monthly cash transfer conditional on school attendance or to a control group. A number of individual-, partner-, household- and school-level factors were associated with HIV and HSV-2 infection. After adjusting for age, all levels were associated with an increased odds of HIV infection with partner-level factors conveying the strongest association (aOR 3.05 95 % CI 1.84–5.06). Interventions like cash transfers that address structural factors such as schooling and poverty have the potential to reduce HIV risk in young women in South Africa.

Keywords

HIV Adolescents South Africa Young women HIV prevention Cash transfers Education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey Pettifor
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Catherine MacPhail
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Amanda Selin
    • 4
  • F. Xavier Gómez-Olivé
    • 2
  • Molly Rosenberg
    • 6
  • Ryan G. Wagner
    • 2
  • Wonderful Mabuza
    • 2
  • James P. Hughes
    • 7
    • 8
  • Chirayath Suchindran
    • 9
    • 4
  • Estelle Piwowar-Manning
    • 10
  • Jing Wang
    • 7
  • Rhian Twine
    • 2
  • Tamu Daniel
    • 4
  • Philip Andrew
    • 11
  • Oliver Laeyendecker
    • 12
    • 13
  • Yaw Agyei
    • 10
  • Stephen Tollman
    • 2
    • 14
    • 15
  • Kathleen Kahn
    • 2
    • 14
    • 15
  • The HPTN 068 protocol team
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Unit, School of Public HealthUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  3. 3.Wits Reproductive Health and HIV InstituteUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  4. 4.Carolina Population CenterUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  5. 5.School of HealthUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia
  6. 6.Center for Population and Development StudiesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  7. 7.SCHARPSeattleUSA
  8. 8.Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  9. 9.Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  10. 10.HPTN Laboratory CenterJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  11. 11.FHI360DurhamUSA
  12. 12.Laboratory of Immunoregulation, NIAIDNIHBaltimoreUSA
  13. 13.Departments of Medicine and EpidemiologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  14. 14.Umeå Centre for Global Health ResearchUmeåSweden
  15. 15.INDEPTH NetworkAccraGhana

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