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Prevalence of HIV Infection and Risk Behaviors Among Younger and Older Injecting Drug Users in the United States, 2009

Abstract

This study compared HIV sero-prevalence and risk behaviors between younger and older injecting drug users (IDUs). IDUs aged ≥18 years were interviewed for the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System. Using GEE regression, we assessed characteristics of younger (18–29 years) and older (≥30 years) IDUs, and factors associated with past 12-month receptive syringe sharing and unprotected sex (vaginal/anal). Of 10,090 participants, 10 % were younger. HIV sero-prevalence was lower among younger than older IDUs (4 vs. 10 %, p = 0.001). Younger IDUs were more likely (p ≤ 0.002) to be non-black race/ethnicity, report higher household income, homelessness, being arrested and to engage in receptive syringe sharing and unprotected sex. In multivariable models, age remained associated (p < 0.001) with receptive syringe sharing (aPR = 1.14, 95 % CI1.07–1.22) and unprotected sex (aPR = 1.10, 95 % CI1.06–1.14). Although younger IDUs had lower HIV prevalence, their behaviors place them at increased risk of HIV infection and could lead to a rapid spread in this susceptible population.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention at the CDC. The authors would like to thank Joseph Prejean and all reviewers for helpful comments on the manuscript. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Correspondence to Dita Broz.

Additional information

This study was conducted for the NHBS study group

The members of this NHBS study group are listed in appendix

Appendix

Appendix

The NHBS Study Group includes to following members: Atlanta, GA: Jennifer Taussig, Shacara Johnson, Jeff Todd; Baltimore, MD: Colin Flynn, Danielle German; Boston, MA: Debbie Isenberg, Maura Driscoll, Elizabeth Hurwitz; Chicago, IL: Nikhil Prachand, Nanette Benbow; Dallas, TX: Sharon Melville, Richard Yeager, Jim Dyer, Alicia Novoa; Denver, CO: Mark Thrun, Alia Al-Tayyib; Detroit, MI: Emily Higgins, Eve Mokotoff, Vivian Griffin; Houston, TX: Aaron Sayegh, Jan Risser, Hafeez Rehman; Los Angeles, CA: Trista Bingham, Ekow Kwa Sey; Miami, FL: Lisa Metsch, David Forrest, Dano Beck, Gabriel Cardenas; Nassau-Suffolk, NY: Chris Nemeth, Lou Smith, Carol-Ann Watson; New Orleans, LA: William T. Robinson, DeAnn Gruber, Narquis Barak; New York City, NY: Alan Neaigus, Samuel Jenness, Travis Wendel, Camila Gelpi-Acosta, Holly Hagan; Newark, NJ: Henry Godette, Barbara Bolden, Sally D’Errico; Philadelphia, PA: Kathleen A. Brady, Althea Kirkland, Mark Shpaner; San Diego, CA: Vanessa Miguelino-Keasling, Al Velasco; San Francisco, CA: H. Fisher Raymond; San Juan, PR: Sandra Miranda De León, Yadira Rolón-Colón; Seattle, WA: Maria Courogen, Hanne Thiede, Richard Burt; St Louis, MO: Michael Herbert, Yelena Friedberg, Dale Wrigley, Jacob Fisher; Washington, DC: Marie Sansone, Tiffany West-Ojo, Manya Magnus, Irene Kuo; Behavioral Surveillance Team

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Broz, D., Pham, H., Spiller, M. et al. Prevalence of HIV Infection and Risk Behaviors Among Younger and Older Injecting Drug Users in the United States, 2009. AIDS Behav 18, 284–296 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-013-0660-4

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Keywords

  • Injecting drug users
  • Young
  • Risk behaviors
  • HIV
  • United States