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Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City

Abstract

Understanding factors associated with recent HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) is important for designing interventions to increase testing rates and link cases to care. A cross-sectional study of MSM was conducted in NYC in 2011 using venue-based sampling. Associations between HIV testing in the past 12 months and relevant variables were examined through the estimation of prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Of 448 participants, 107 (23.9 %) had not been tested in the past 12 months. Factors independently associated with not testing in the previous 12 months were: lack of a visit to a healthcare provider in the past 12 months (aPR: 2.5; 95 % CI: 1.9, 3.2); age ≥30 (adjusted PR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.4, 2.7); not having completed a bachelor’s degree (aPR: 1.6; 95 % CI: 1.0, 2.4); and non-gay sexual identity (aPR: 1.4; 95 % CI: 1.0, 1.8); such MSM may be less aware of the need for frequent HIV testing.

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Acknowledgments

This research was funded by a cooperative agreement between the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Grant# 1U1BPS003246-01). The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of The CDC. The authors acknowledge Gabriela Paz-Bailey, Dita Broz, and Isa Miles of CDC for their contributions to the NHBS study design; Colin Shepard, Kent Sepkowitz, Jay Varma, James Hadler and Julie Myers of the NYC DOHMH for reviewing previous drafts of this article; and the NYC NHBS field staff for all their efforts.

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Correspondence to K. H. Reilly.

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Reilly, K.H., Neaigus, A., Jenness, S.M. et al. Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City. AIDS Behav 18 (Suppl 3), 297–304 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-013-0483-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-013-0483-3

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Men that have sex with men
  • New York City
  • HIV testing
  • HIV prevention