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Patterns and Predictors of HIV/STI Risk Among Latino Migrant Men in a New Receiving Community

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine patterns and predictors of HIV/STI risk over time among Latino migrant men in a new receiving community. Latino men (N = 125) were interviewed quarterly for 18 months and HIV/STI tested annually. Selected individual, environmental and cultural factors by partner type and condom use were explored longitudinally and in a cross-section. Sex with female sex workers (FSWs) and multiple partners decreased, sex with main partners and abstinence increased, while the number of casual partners remained stable. Consistent condom use was highest with FSWs, lowest with main partners and midrange with casual partners with no trends over time. STI morbidity was low; no HIV was detected. Drug use and high mobility were associated with inconsistent condom use with FSW, whereas having family in the household was protective. HIV/STI prevention efforts should focus on drug using Latino migrants who are highly mobile and should foster healthy social connections.

Resumen

El propósito de este estudio fue examinar patrones y predictores de riesgo de VIH/SIDA en un tiempo determinado entre hombres Latinos migrantes en una nueva comunidad de recibo. Hombres Latinos (N = 125) fueron entrevistados trimestralmente por 18 meses y se les practicaron pruebas de VIH/ITS anualmente. Se exploró transversal y longitudinalmente tipos de pareja y uso de condón en individuos seleccionados tomando en cuenta factores culturales y ambientales. El sexo con trabajadoras del sexo y múltiples parejas sexuales disminuyó, el sexo con la pareja principal y abstinencia incrementó, mientras que el número de parejas casuales permaneció estable. El uso consistente de condón fue el más alto con trabajadoras del sexo el más bajo con la pareja principal y termino medio con las parejas casuales sin ninguna tendencia durante el tiempo determinado. La morbilidad en ITS fué baja y no se detectó VIH. El uso de drogas y la alta movilidad fue asociado con el uso inconsistente de condón con trabajadoras del sexo, mientras que tener un familiar en casa fue un factor de protección. Los esfuerzos de prevención en VIH/ITS se debieran enfocar al uso de drogas en migrantes Latinos quienes son altamente móviles y debieran propiciar conecciones sociales saludables.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by CDC H25 ps604346-16 and NIDA 1R21DA026806-01. Thanks to the following agencies for provision of space for interviewing: Family Advocacy Care and Education Services of Children’s Hospital, NO/AIDS Task Force, South West Louisiana Area Health Education Center; and for provision of materials and testing services: Louisiana Office of Public Health, N’R PEACE, Delgado Personal Health Center; and for their advice and input into survey questions: Louisiana Latino Health Coalition, the Latino Forum and The Latino Commission on AIDS—Deep South Project. Thanks also to Roberta Hess of Research for Health, Inc. who gave permission to use the HIV/AIDS version of the PFI, to Dr. Emilio A. Parrado for his insight and advice on the early phases of the study design, and to Juan Cleto, Joshua Acuna, Christian Legett, and Matthew O’Shea for their participation in data collection.

Financial support

This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Grant Number R21DA030269 and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant number H25 ps604346-16. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIDA, the NIH or the CDC.

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Correspondence to Patricia Kissinger.

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The findings and conclusions in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Louisiana Office of Public Health.

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Kissinger, P., Kovacs, S., Anderson-Smits, C. et al. Patterns and Predictors of HIV/STI Risk Among Latino Migrant Men in a New Receiving Community. AIDS Behav 16, 199–213 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-011-9945-7

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Keywords

  • HIV
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Migrants
  • Latinos
  • Respondent driven sampling

Palabras Claves

  • VIH
  • infecciones de transmisión sexual
  • migrantes
  • latinos
  • muestreo dirigido por entrevistados (RDS por sus siglas en inglés)