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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 1148–1155 | Cite as

Predicting Partner HIV Testing and Counseling Following a Partner Notification Intervention

  • Lillian B. BrownEmail author
  • William C. Miller
  • Gift Kamanga
  • Jay S. Kaufman
  • Audrey Pettifor
  • Rosalie C. Dominik
  • Naomi Nyirenda
  • Pearson Mmodzi
  • Clement Mapanje
  • Francis Martinson
  • Myron S. Cohen
  • Irving F. Hoffman
Original Paper

Abstract

Provider-assisted methods of partner notification increase testing and counseling among sexual partners of patients diagnosed with HIV, however they are resource-intensive. The sexual partners of individuals enrolled in a clinical trial comparing different methods of HIV partner notification were analyzed to identify who was unlikely to seek testing on their own. Unconditional logistic regression was used to identify partnership characteristics, which were assigned a score based on their coefficient in the final model, and a risk score was calculated for each participant. The risk score included male partner sex, relationship duration 6–24 months, and index education > primary. A risk score of ≥2 had a sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 78% in identifying partners unlikely to seek testing on their own. A risk score to target partner notification can reduce the resources required to locate all partners in the community while increasing the testing yield compared to patient-referral.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS Partner notification Contact tracing Sub-Saharan Africa 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), an NIH funded program #P30 AI50410, NIH grant 1F30MH085431, NIH grant 5R01AI83059 and NIH grant T32 GM008719.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lillian B. Brown
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • William C. Miller
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gift Kamanga
    • 2
  • Jay S. Kaufman
    • 1
    • 4
  • Audrey Pettifor
    • 1
  • Rosalie C. Dominik
    • 1
  • Naomi Nyirenda
    • 2
  • Pearson Mmodzi
    • 2
  • Clement Mapanje
    • 2
  • Francis Martinson
    • 2
  • Myron S. Cohen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Irving F. Hoffman
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, CB#7435University of North Carolina-Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.UNC ProjectLilongweMalawi
  3. 3.Division of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of North Carolina-Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.McGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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