AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 1054–1062 | Cite as

Polling Booth Surveys: A Novel Approach for Reducing Social Desirability Bias in HIV-Related Behavioural Surveys in Resource-Poor Settings

  • Catherine M. Lowndes
  • A. A. Jayachandran
  • Pradeep Banandur
  • Banadakoppa M. Ramesh
  • Reynold Washington
  • B. M. Sangameshwar
  • Stephen Moses
  • James Blanchard
  • Michel Alary
Brief Report

Abstract

This study compared rates of HIV-related sexual risk behaviours reported in individual face-to-face (FTFI) and group anonymous polling booth (PBS) interviews in India. In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered yes/no questions by putting tokens with question numbers in colour-coded containers. Data were subsequently collated for each group as a whole, so responses were not traceable back to individuals. Male and female PBS participants reported substantially higher rates of pre-marital, extra-marital, commercial and anal sex than FTFI participants; e.g. 11 vs. 2% married males reported paying for sex; 6 vs. 1% unmarried males reported homosexual anal sex.

Keywords

India HIV Social desirability bias Sexual behaviour Survey methodologies Interviewing techniques 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine M. Lowndes
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. A. Jayachandran
    • 4
  • Pradeep Banandur
    • 4
    • 5
  • Banadakoppa M. Ramesh
    • 6
    • 7
  • Reynold Washington
    • 7
    • 8
  • B. M. Sangameshwar
    • 7
    • 9
  • Stephen Moses
    • 6
  • James Blanchard
    • 6
  • Michel Alary
    • 1
    • 10
  1. 1.URESPCentre de Recherche FRSQ du CHA Universitaire de QuébecQuebecCanada
  2. 2.Department of HIV & Sexually Transmitted InfectionsHealth Protection Services—Colindale, Health Protection AgencyLondonUK
  3. 3.London School of Hygiene & Tropical MedicineLondonUK
  4. 4.CHARME-India ProjectBangaloreIndia
  5. 5.Rajarajeswari Medical College and HospitalBangaloreIndia
  6. 6.University of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  7. 7.Karnataka Health Promotion TrustBangaloreIndia
  8. 8.St. John’s Medical College and HospitalBangaloreIndia
  9. 9.Karuna Medical College and HospitalPalakkadIndia
  10. 10.Département de médecine sociale et préventiveUniversité LavalQuébecCanada

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