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Do Social Support, Stress, Disclosure and Stigma Influence Retention in HIV Care for Latino and African American Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women?

Abstract

Limited research has examined the role that social support, stress, stigma and HIV disclosure play in retention in HIV care for African Americans and Latinos. Among 398 Latino and African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and women, the major predictor of retention in HIV care was disclosure of HIV status to more social network members (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9). Among those who had disclosed (n = 334), female gender (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1) and disclosure of HIV status to more network members (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9) was associated with retention in HIV care. General stress was associated with retention in care (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.3) for African American MSM who had disclosed. More MSM-stigma was associated with poorer retention (OR = 0.9; 95% CI: 0.8, 0.9) for Latino MSM. Interventions that help patients safely disclose their HIV status to more social network members may improve HIV care retention as would social network counseling for Latino MSM to reduce MSM-stigma.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank all of the clinic staff, study participants and the project interviewers, Alexander Carruth and Christian Chavez. The authors would also like to acknowledge Rhodri Dierst-Davies for help with data analysis. This research was supported by the California HIV/AIDS Research Program Grant CH05-LAC-617 and CH05-DREW-616.

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Correspondence to Amy Rock Wohl.

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Wohl, A.R., Galvan, F.H., Myers, H.F. et al. Do Social Support, Stress, Disclosure and Stigma Influence Retention in HIV Care for Latino and African American Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women?. AIDS Behav 15, 1098–1110 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-010-9833-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-010-9833-6

Keywords

  • Social support
  • Stress
  • Stigma
  • HIV disclosure
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Women
  • African American
  • Latino